Name discrepancy

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
User avatar
njmaiello
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 1
Joined: 23 Feb 2008, 23:11

Name discrepancy

Postby njmaiello » 10 Jan 2009, 00:25

I received my father's birth certificate from NYC and was surprised to learn that his given name was Vincenzo.He used James his whole life,its on all official documents,military records,death certificate and my birth certificate.Will this discrepancy be a problem for me with my Italian citizenship application? All other information on his birth certificate is accurate.Any input would be appreciated.Thanks

User avatar
bonval
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 79
Joined: 16 Feb 2004, 00:00
Location: Florida
Contact:

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby bonval » 10 Jan 2009, 07:26

I am not sure how much of a problem it will be ...but....interestingly we have a family member from NY who also went from Vincenzo to James! One family member thought it may have been done when they arrived? So then they named a son Vincenzo but also referred to him everywhere else as James Vincent.

User avatar
johnnyonthespot
Master
Master
Posts: 5229
Joined: 04 Aug 2008, 15:01
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby johnnyonthespot » 10 Jan 2009, 10:38

njmaiello wrote:I received my father's birth certificate from NYC and was surprised to learn that his given name was Vincenzo.He used James his whole life,its on all official documents,military records,death certificate and my birth certificate.Will this discrepancy be a problem for me with my Italian citizenship application? All other information on his birth certificate is accurate.Any input would be appreciated.Thanks


Vincenzo to James was a common Americanization; I myself have an "Uncle Jimmy" who's real name is Vincenzo.

How important this will be depends on the consulate where you will be applying; some are known to be more lenient than others. The problem is a simple one: the consulate needs to be certain that all of your documents pertain to the same person. After all, maybe this Vincenzo's birth certificate actually belongs to an entirely different man, and, maybe your real father - James - was actually born in a third country and holds neither American or Italian citizenship. How can they be certain?

See what I mean?

That is why the consulates are so picky about ensuring that names and birthdates match up when comparing documents.

Is your father still living? If so, you/he may want to consider requesting his birth certificate be amended to include an "AKA: James" (Also Known As) statement, although such a step should be well thought out as to possible unforseen ramifications. See this NYC form and/or website for details.

You might also consider obtaining one or more sworn statements from persons who would have direct knowledge that your father "James" and the "Vincenzo" on the birth certificate are/were one and the same person. Doctors or attorneys with whom your father may have had a business relationship would be prime sources for this type of statement.

If your father has passed away and left a formal Last Will & Testament, check it to see if it included his correct birth name. (my apologies; I just re-read and see that your father is deceased)

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 1627
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby mler » 10 Jan 2009, 19:11

If your birth certificate is also from NYC, I can tell you that it's easy to amend your own birth certificate so that your father's name reads "Vincenzo." You will need to go (or this can be done by mail) to the Corrections Office with a certified copy of your dad's birth certificate. I went in person and received my amended birth certificate in a few months.

My father had been listed as 'Harry' on his marriage certificate, on my birth certificate, and on my grandfather's Petition. The name on his birth certificate is 'Enrico.' I made the change only on my birth certificate and did not have a problem in NY.

As you know, however, things change rapidly at the consulates, so there are never any quarantees. Other consulates may also view this differently.

(I should add that this was also OK in Newark.)

User avatar
jcat
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 116
Joined: 10 Jan 2009, 20:47
Location: Florida
Contact:

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby jcat » 10 Jan 2009, 21:14

My grandfather also was named Vincenzo and used James here in the states. His Italian birth certificate reads Vincenzo and my fathers birth certificate has him as James, and his death certificate, luckily "reads" James(Vincenzo) I have discussed this with the officer(Virginia) at the Miami consulate, who by the way, is a most charming and thoughtful person, where I will be applying for citizenship and she has informed me as long as there is other sufficient documentation supporting the name James there would not be a problem. The key is to be loaded with as much supporting documentation as possible.

User avatar
vieuxrenard
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 1
Joined: 12 Jan 2009, 17:41

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby vieuxrenard » 12 Jan 2009, 17:47

I'm having a similar problem and could use some suggestions. My father's birthdate is listed the same on all documents except one...his marriage certificate. The clerk or priest mixed up the date of his baptism with his birth. Although all my documents were in order and this was the only glitch, the officer at the consulate here flatly refused to continue until I could present a corrected document proving that the person on the marriage certificate was the same person as on all the other documents. I mean, it didn't take a rocket scientist to draw lines from one document to another, since the parents listed on the marriage certificate were the same as on my father's other documents, and my mothers name on the marriage certificate is the same as that on my birth certificate.
Suggestions on how to correct this error? Quickly!
thanks

User avatar
johnnyonthespot
Master
Master
Posts: 5229
Joined: 04 Aug 2008, 15:01
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby johnnyonthespot » 12 Jan 2009, 18:30

vieuxrenard wrote:I'm having a similar problem and could use some suggestions. My father's birthdate is listed the same on all documents except one...his marriage certificate. The clerk or priest mixed up the date of his baptism with his birth. Although all my documents were in order and this was the only glitch, the officer at the consulate here flatly refused to continue until I could present a corrected document proving that the person on the marriage certificate was the same person as on all the other documents. I mean, it didn't take a rocket scientist to draw lines from one document to another, since the parents listed on the marriage certificate were the same as on my father's other documents, and my mothers name on the marriage certificate is the same as that on my birth certificate.
Suggestions on how to correct this error? Quickly!
thanks


What state and is your father and/or mother still living?

Marriage certificates can be difficult to change in some states, easier in others. If I recall correctly, in NY for example, only the husband or wife can request a change and once they are gone, there is nothing which can be done.

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 1627
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Name discrepancy

Postby mler » 13 Jan 2009, 00:25

vieuxrenard wrote:I'm having a similar problem and could use some suggestions. My father's birthdate is listed the same on all documents except one...his marriage certificate. The clerk or priest mixed up the date of his baptism with his birth. Although all my documents were in order and this was the only glitch, the officer at the consulate here flatly refused to continue ...

At what consulate did you apply? The marriage document should be the least significant of all the documents since, after all, you are Italian even if your parents never married.

If you are unable to change the marriage certificate and the consulate insists upon that change, you might want to bring in your father's baptismal certificate to explain the error. An affidavit from either your father (if he is still living), or a close relative attesting to that date as an error may also work.


Return to “Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests