Another (“jure sanguinisâ€

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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TangoChaser
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Another (“jure sanguinisâ€

Postby TangoChaser » 13 Nov 2009, 04:29

I went to the Italian Consulate website for Miami Florida to see what forms and information I would need and have a couple questions.

Bio: Grandfather born in Italy, Came to US in 1907. Served in WW I,
The 1930 Census asks the question "Naturalized" it is answered NO.

My father was born in Philadelphia PA. (US)

Question #1: Would he not be a Italian Citizen via jure sanguinis? Thus I
follow those requirements?

Question #2: Based on the Census above there would be no "Certificate
of Naturalization to obtain. (THAT IS #3 on the Required
items list on the Consulate website.

Question #3: It also states I need my parents "Marriage Certificate".
My father and mother were never married. NOW WHAT?

Question #4: It states I need to fill out a declaration that I never
renounced Italian Citizenship. Thats it? Just fill out
form 2 from the site? I dont need to send for something?

Question #5: Declaration my father never renounced Italian Citizenship.
He is deceased. How do I find out? I do not believe he did.

The requirements I talk of were located on the Italian Consulate website
located HERE: http://www.consmiami.esteri.it/Consolat ... tadinanza/

Thanks in advance for any direction you may give.

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Another (“jure sanguinisâ€

Postby johnnyonthespot » 13 Nov 2009, 11:50

1) Your father was an Italian citizen by virtue of having been the son of an Italian citizen - if and only if your grandfather was still a citizen at thte time of your father's birth. You must prove this to be a fact. The easiest and fastest route is to prove that your grandfather did naturalize after your father's birth.

The best place to begin is the place where you will most likely end up eventually anyway, at the USCIS web site. Start with an "Index search" and if it comes back positive, proceed with a record request.

If you are antsy, you may be able to get documents a bit faster by querying the National Archives ("NARA") or even local county or state archives. Where was your grandfather living at the time that he may have naturalized?

2) The reason I said it is easier to prove that he did naturalize than that he didn't is that the latter is much more time-consuming. You will need to obtain a letter of "No Records Found" from USCIS and that can take a year or more. You will also need other supporting documents which vary by consulate.

3) I believe you can simply state that your parents never married. It is critical however that your father's name appears on your own birth certificate.

4) The consulate knows that no one renounces Italian citizenship and is content to have you "self-certify" this fact. Besides, if you had renounced citizenship, the Italian government would have a record of it already.

5) See #4. In the case of a deceased ancestor, you are permitted to make the certification for them.

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Re: Another (“jure sanguinisâ€

Postby TangoChaser » 13 Nov 2009, 14:28

I think I'm screwed.

I just recieved the Long copy of my Birth Certicifate hoping it had more information then the short form.

Seems both long and short have an error. It shows my name as my fathers name

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Another (“jure sanguinisâ€

Postby johnnyonthespot » 13 Nov 2009, 14:56

TangoChaser wrote:I think I'm screwed.

I just recieved the Long copy of my Birth Certicifate hoping it had more information then the short form.

Seems both long and short have an error. It shows my name as my fathers name


Birth certificates can be corrected. Contact the Vital Records / Department of Health in the state in which you were born to learn the procedure.

Is your father still living? Does he acknowledge parentage? If so, I don't think you will have a problem fixing your birth certificate.

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Re: Another (“jure sanguinisâ€

Postby TangoChaser » 13 Nov 2009, 21:25

He's deceased. I didn't know records could be "corrected". Thanks I'll look into that. But it seems there is enough confusion I could be his brothers son.

I think this family tree would make Dr. Phil and Jerry Springer shake their heads.


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