Does this scenario qualify?

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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fjrosaio
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Does this scenario qualify?

Postby fjrosaio » 23 Dec 2009, 16:42

Helping a friend start the dual citizenship process and want to be sure the following scenario qualifies before proceeding:

Friend - born in 1978 in U.S.A.

Friend's father - born in 1954 in U.S.A.

Friend's paternal grandmother - born in 1932 in U.S.A.

Friend's paternal grandmother's father - born in Italy in 1893. Naturalized in 1940.

Does this family line qualify for dual citizenship?

Thanks!

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JamesBianco
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Re: Does this scenario qualify?

Postby JamesBianco » 23 Dec 2009, 17:02

In a nutshell, yes this line does qualify.


Most important (typical) hindrances your friend is not disqualified for:

1. The immigrant naturalized after the birth of his American born child.

2. The female line carrier gave birth after January 1, 1948.

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fjrosaio
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Re: Does this scenario qualify?

Postby fjrosaio » 24 Dec 2009, 15:46

Thanks very much, I appreciate your help!

One further question (seems obvious, but I have to ask):

Are the apostilles obtained from the Secretary of State in the state where the individual applying for dual citizenship resides?

For example, if I live in Massachusetts (and am applying through the consulate in Boston), do I obtain all my apostilles in Massachusetts (even for those vital records not issued in Massachusetts)?

Again, thanks muchly!

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jwazevedo
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Re: Does this scenario qualify?

Postby jwazevedo » 25 Dec 2009, 06:14

No, the apostilles come from the jurisdiction that issued the certificates. Think of an apostille as like a verification of the signature on the certificate. Each state keeps track of its own notaries and registrars and the like, so only that state can verify the signature. You can go online and check the process for getting the apostille from the state where your certificates were issued. It's usually pretty painless to do by mail.

Good luck with that,
Jerry

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Mulé
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Re: Does this scenario qualify?

Postby Mulé » 26 Dec 2009, 13:56

Also while this seems obvious I will state it just the same. Documents issued by Federal Agencies like the USCIS can be apostilled by the Department of State in Washington.


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