Can I get this an apostille?

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Rastafeyd
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Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Rastafeyd » 27 Jan 2010, 00:58

I just received a photocopy of a record from the County Archives of my Great Grandfather's birth. This is the only thing I have stating my great grandfather's birth. Does anyone know whether it would be possible to get an apostille on this and use it as evidence for my great grandfather's birth? Thanks.

Mike

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CowryShells
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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby CowryShells » 27 Jan 2010, 13:33

To know everything required, it depends on where the document was originally issued. However, to get an apostille from the the secretary of state's office in any US state, the document would at least need to be certified (usually with an embossed seal) and signed by the county clerk or registrar.

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Mulé
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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Mulé » 30 Jan 2010, 17:36

If that document is an issue you might have to look into filing a delayed birth certificate for your GGF which would most likely require a court order. Which state is this for, some states are easier than others? Most places you can do the court order yourself at the motions court, without the need for an attorney and expense. Contact the vital records department for that state to find out what they require and the process.

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Rastafeyd
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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Rastafeyd » 30 Jan 2010, 19:07

It is the state of Ohio. In fact, after I had already posted I looked closer at the copy and it doesn't have my Great Grandfather's name, apparently they hadn't decided on a name at the time of filling out the paperwork. Nonetheless, it does have both of their names and the date of birth along with other information. Any idea whether that is going to cause a problem with the Chicago consulate, or getting a court order to do a delayed birth certificate, like you suggested? Thanks.

Michael

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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Mulé » 30 Jan 2010, 19:19

Rastafeyd wrote:It is the state of Ohio. In fact, after I had already posted I looked closer at the copy and it doesn't have my Great Grandfather's name, apparently they hadn't decided on a name at the time of filling out the paperwork. Nonetheless, it does have both of their names and the date of birth along with other information. Any idea whether that is going to cause a problem with the Chicago consulate, or getting a court order to do a delayed birth certificate, like you suggested? Thanks.

Michael

Do you have a scan/PDF version of the document? I am interested as to what it shows, if there is no name indicated. What year is it from? Does it indicate the sex of the child? Does it indicate a live birth? I am not sure how you would link a person to it, if their name isn't shown. Maybe by associating other documents with the same birth date for the same person to the parents or other pieces of information on that document. Without knowing more it is hard to speculate.

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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Rastafeyd » 31 Jan 2010, 20:55

I've attached a scanned copy of the paperwork I received from the Cuyahoga County Archives. As you can see there is no name under the Child's name, though it has in parathenses (if any has been given). The name of the parents, dob, sex and other info is there.

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby johnnyonthespot » 31 Jan 2010, 21:23

My mother went the first 82 years of her life without a name on her New York birth certificate. To make matters worse, both her mother and father's surnames were spelled incorrectly.

New York State has a simple procedure to add a child's name to a birth record - at least it is simple if a parent or the "child" is still living. To get her parent's names corrected, I had to submit certified/translated/apostilled copies of her parent's Italian birth and marriage certificates. It was a lot of running back and forth (it seemed) and took more than six months, but I felt it was something that should be done

I didn't need this for my dual citizenship as I went through my father's line and had already been approved. This was a "side" project.
Carmine

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Mulé
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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Mulé » 31 Jan 2010, 22:39

What is sex listed as, boy? The card below indicates sex: Male.

The department of vital records for Ohio doesn't have this birth recorded?
http://www.odh.ohio.gov/vitalstatistics/vitalstats.aspx
http://www.odh.ohio.gov/vitalstatistics ... order.aspx

Search for "ohio delayed birth" on google and there are some things to read. The first PDF on the top of the list has some guidelines.

Seems that delayed and correct birth record are simply handled in the probate courts in Ohio.

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Re: Can I get this an apostille?

Postby Mulé » 31 Jan 2010, 22:46

Just saw that Hamilton county has a nice PDF outlining the details for the delayed birth certificate, as well as Franklin county.

http://www.franklincountyohio.gov/proba ... gistration

Delayed Birth Registration

To apply for a Delayed Birth Registration through this Probate Court, you must have been born in the State of Ohio. You will need to provide the Court with a "No-Record" Letter from the Ohio Department of Health, Vital Statistics. (Note: For births that occurred prior to December 20, 1908, please contact the Probate Court in the county where the birth occurred for the search.) Once you have this "No-Record" Letter, you must present the Court with three (3) valid documents to prove the exact date and place of your birth and your parents' names. Below is an example of evidence that may be used in this Court:


1. Certificate of Baptism
2. Federal Census Records
3. School records or transcripts, with an original signature from the records secretary
4. Honorable Discharge from U.S. Armed Forces (DD 214)
5. Certified copy of application for marriage license, showing vital information
6. Life insurance policies (still in effect), at least four (4) years old, showing date and place of birth
7. Letter from Hospital or Doctor (indicating vital information) on letterhead
8. Notarized Affidavit of a witness to the birth
9. Certified copy of one (1) child's birth certification


If your document does work, you will most likely have to go this route, get a birth certificate created through the probate court order, then request the certificate like usual from Ohio and get an apostille applied to it. I had to have one create in PA for my GF, who was born in 1917. I didn't have that document you had to start with. I had to show the court many documents that had his name, place of birth, date of birth, parents, etc all that matched. I used SS, Army records, school records, baptism certificate, etc... Wasn't difficult, just took time as I chose not to hire an attorney. Good luck, let us know how it turns out and what you have done, if your document is sufficient proof or not.


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