1948 law with women

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
User avatar
DeFilippis78
Master
Master
Posts: 1144
Joined: 02 Dec 2009, 02:19

1948 law with women

Postby DeFilippis78 » 01 Mar 2010, 00:54

Im under the assumption a woman cant pass on citizenship unless she was born after 1948 regardless of being an alien or naturalized. Is that correct? I was wondering, if a woman never naturalized, if it made a difference in the law.

Alicia

User avatar
johnnyonthespot
Master
Master
Posts: 5229
Joined: 04 Aug 2008, 15:01
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby johnnyonthespot » 01 Mar 2010, 03:02

No, that is not exactly how it works.

It is not a question of when the woman was born, but when her child was born.

Prior to January 1, 1948, Italian citizenship was passed only by the father. On or after Janury 1, 1948, citizenship could be passed by the father or the mother.

Naturalization is not the issue, per se. If the woman was an Italian citizen, or had the right to Italian citizenship, then any children born to her on or after that date also have the right to Italian citizenship.

However, if the woman lost her right to Italian citizenship (by naturalizing, for example) then she no longer had the ability to pass on citizenship, regardless of the date of her child's birth.
Carmine

My hobby is finding things. Having found most of my own, I am happy to help others find theirs. PM me! :)

User avatar
DeFilippis78
Master
Master
Posts: 1144
Joined: 02 Dec 2009, 02:19

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby DeFilippis78 » 01 Mar 2010, 03:10

delete

User avatar
Squigy
Master
Master
Posts: 724
Joined: 02 Jun 2009, 06:05
Location: Texas, USA (Born in Pennsylvania)

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby Squigy » 01 Mar 2010, 11:25

Hi, Alicia. I don't believe these would work because they all start with women who's children were born before 1948, unless Giuseppa is really Giuseppe. Is that right, Johnny? I'm trying to make sure I know how this works, as it does get confusing.
My Italian surnames:

Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone

Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile

Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito

User avatar
johnnyonthespot
Master
Master
Posts: 5229
Joined: 04 Aug 2008, 15:01
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby johnnyonthespot » 01 Mar 2010, 13:14

Squiggy, you are correct based on the info given.

Certainly, however, Adelina, and Giuseppa had "Italian" husbands? If those husbands were still provably Italian citizens at the time that Francesco and Antonio were born, then they would have inherited Italian blood through their fathers and Italian blood would have flowed onwards down to Alicia.

Serafina is the one absolute dead end, because even if her husband was Italian and thus Mary inherited from her father, Josephine could not have inherited from Mary. Unless of course Mary married an Italian male who was still Italian at the time of Josephine's birth.
Carmine

My hobby is finding things. Having found most of my own, I am happy to help others find theirs. PM me! :)

User avatar
DeFilippis78
Master
Master
Posts: 1144
Joined: 02 Dec 2009, 02:19

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby DeFilippis78 » 01 Mar 2010, 13:33

delete

User avatar
sal4
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 188
Joined: 06 Apr 2009, 19:16

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby sal4 » 01 Mar 2010, 16:03

When my Grandfather became a citizen in 1943, did my grandmother automatically become one also? and since she did not herself denounce her Italian citizenship does that mean she would still be a Italian citizen? I hope I'm phrasing this right.....Sal4
Looking for surnames Iasalvatore (Salvatore), Tartaglia, Rosetta, Consola, Di Muccio, Castellano, Montanaro, Dipaolo, Costa, Sansone, Giudicianni and Laudato.

User avatar
DeFilippis78
Master
Master
Posts: 1144
Joined: 02 Dec 2009, 02:19

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby DeFilippis78 » 01 Mar 2010, 16:05

You mean when your grandfather naturalized in 1943 did that automatically naturalize his wife?

Alicia

User avatar
sal4
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 188
Joined: 06 Apr 2009, 19:16

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby sal4 » 01 Mar 2010, 16:17

Yes and did that mean she also had to give up her Italian Citizenship, in all of her papers I don't have anything showing she was naturalized (only an Alien regristration card) or that she denounced her Italian citizenship....Sal4
Looking for surnames Iasalvatore (Salvatore), Tartaglia, Rosetta, Consola, Di Muccio, Castellano, Montanaro, Dipaolo, Costa, Sansone, Giudicianni and Laudato.

User avatar
DeFilippis78
Master
Master
Posts: 1144
Joined: 02 Dec 2009, 02:19

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby DeFilippis78 » 01 Mar 2010, 16:24

Im still new at all these laws so someone will have to clarify this for you. But I think I read that when a spouse becomes naturalized the other one didnt automatically become naturalized too. I just think it was common for husband and wife to apply at the same time though. But I think they both had to submit separate applications. If someone doesnt clarify this for you, because Im not certain, start a new thread to get a clear answer.

Alicia

User avatar
sal4
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 188
Joined: 06 Apr 2009, 19:16

Re: 1948 law with women

Postby sal4 » 01 Mar 2010, 16:28

Thank You..... I will start a new thread.........Sal4
Looking for surnames Iasalvatore (Salvatore), Tartaglia, Rosetta, Consola, Di Muccio, Castellano, Montanaro, Dipaolo, Costa, Sansone, Giudicianni and Laudato.


Return to “Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 4 guests