Difficulties in DC with Citizenship Jure Sanguinis

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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jeremykeim
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Difficulties in DC with Citizenship Jure Sanguinis

Postby jeremykeim » 18 Jun 2010, 16:06

I visited the Italian embassy in D.C. today to submit my application for citizenship jure sanguinis (through my paternal grandmother). The clerk indicated that was in order and that I had all of the appropriate documents, apostilles and translations, but that I could not apply for citizenship until after my Father had done so. Once he was approved, then I would be able to apply. This was different than what my research indicated, but she said there was no other way.

I contacted the consulate in San Francisco (in my Father's jurisdiction), but was told it was a TWO YEAR wait for jure sanguinis application appointments.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Difficulties in DC with Citizenship Jure Sanguinis

Postby johnnyonthespot » 18 Jun 2010, 16:32

Details are in order...

If I were to guess, it seems that you do not have an unbroken lineage either because your grandmother naturalized prior to your father's birth or because your father was born before January 1, 1948 (prior to that date, Italian citizenship was passed only through the male parent).

If your lineage is intact - your grandmother was an Italian citizen at the time of your father's birth and he was born on or after 1/1/1948, then the embassy is simply wrong. If, however, you indicated that your father was also interested in having his citizenship recognized, the embassy may feel it would be simpler if he "went first" so to speak.

I presume you are a legal adult?
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jeremykeim
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Re: Difficulties in DC with Citizenship Jure Sanguinis

Postby jeremykeim » 18 Jun 2010, 16:52

johnnyonthespot wrote:Details are in order...

If I were to guess, it seems that you do not have an unbroken lineage either because your grandmother naturalized prior to your father's birth or because your father was born before January 1, 1948 (prior to that date, Italian citizenship was passed only through the male parent).

If your lineage is intact - your grandmother was an Italian citizen at the time of your father's birth and he was born on or after 1/1/1948, then the embassy is simply wrong. If, however, you indicated that your father was also interested in having his citizenship recognized, the embassy may feel it would be simpler if he "went first" so to speak.

I presume you are a legal adult?


My father was born in 1950. My grandmother naturalized in 1960. Based on all of my research, there should not be any issues with respect to the right. From what I understand, the embassy is incorrect, but I do not think that I will get much mileage from attempting to argue the point. I didn't indicate that my Father was interested in having citizenship as well, that was something that she said was an absolute requirement. My father is willing to get his right recognized, but does not really care one way or the other. I would just rather not wait 2 years for the process to move forward when there is no wait time in D.C. where I currently reside.

I am a legal adult. Maybe the answer is to have him move in with me (he's retired and more than happy to move to his kids).

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Difficulties in DC with Citizenship Jure Sanguinis

Postby johnnyonthespot » 18 Jun 2010, 17:10

I agree with you; from what you have said, there is no need for your father to apply separately and I cannot understand why the embassy is being insistent on this matter.

Your father does not need to apply for citizenship, but it is true that the nature of the process is that first your grandmother's citizenship will be ascertained, then your father's potential for citizenship, followed by your own. If your father were deceased, this would not be an issue, but the embassy seems to be saying that since he is living, he must go through the process before you will be allowed to proceed. I know of no other consulate which makes this demand.

Unfortunately, I don't know of a way out for you; I agree that you have to be careful how hard you push an Italian bureaucrat before he/she pushes back with a vengance.

If your father could come to the Washington area and apply for a driver's license or some other form of official identification using your address as his "home", you may be able to sneak him into the embassy...
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