Is there any way around the 1948 problem??

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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beauac
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Is there any way around the 1948 problem??

Postby beauac » 11 Sep 2010, 00:16

Hello everyone. I have been researching my family tree and trying to get citizenship. I thought I had it until I read about the wretched 1948 clause. My great great gf was born in Italy in 1879 and came to America in 1892. Only problem is he only had a daughter and not a son. She had my gf in 1929. How could Italy be this stupid and discriminate against woman like this? They don´t think that woman are good enough to pass on citizenship but without woman there would not be any Italians at all in the first place! Seems like neanderthal logic. I know the people on this site don´t make the rules but it needed to be said somewhere. They could have righted a wrong by making the 1948 law retroactive.

Any ideas on what I can do? I don't want to try my fathers side because they don't know much about the family history. It kind of makes me feel ashamed to have an Italian name and Italian forfathers and then be rejected by the motherland because I had a forfather of the wrong sex.


This was half rant and half serious plea for help.I appreciate any suggestions. Thanks!

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Is there any way around the 1948 problem??

Postby johnnyonthespot » 11 Sep 2010, 18:18

It was the modern post-WWII Italian constitution which took effect on January 1, 1948 which gave women essentially the same rights as men.

Prior to that date, Italian women had limited rights, just as US women were unable to vote for the first 100-and-something years of our country's existence.

As to your father's side, it may not be as difficult as it first seems to research. Start with what you know and work backwards; get a copy of your father's long-form birth certificate and see what his father's name and birthplace were. If father's father was born in the US, obtain his birth certificate; if he was born in Italy, then research his arrival in the US and seek out birthplace and naturalization info.

Believe me, many of us began with very little certain knowledge of our ancestry and have ultimately found far more than we could have dreamed.
Carmine

My hobby is finding things. Having found most of my own, I am happy to help others find theirs. PM me! :)

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KarenChristino
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Re: Is there any way around the 1948 problem??

Postby KarenChristino » 13 Sep 2010, 17:10

I have the same situation as you and just wanted to reiterate what Carmine said. It would have been much, much easier for me to go through my GM's line. My GF died when I was just 5 and his father died when my dad was 12, so none of us really knew much about that family. You will see how quickly you can find documents when you get started. And, as I'm sure everyone agrees, it is extremely gratifying, and you will discover surprising things in the process. Of course there will be some delays and challenges, but I think everyone encounters that. You can always query the forum for help!

Karen

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mler
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Re: Is there any way around the 1948 problem??

Postby mler » 14 Sep 2010, 12:26

Many people have run into a similar problem. I also used my dad's line because my mother's was eliminated by the 1948 rule. While I was collecting the documents, I learned a lot about my dad's family and made connections with relatives in Italy. Ultimately, my dad's papers had fewer discrepancies, making the process easier. So don't be discouraged. It will be fine.

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Gianna75010
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Re: Is there any way around the 1948 problem??

Postby Gianna75010 » 15 Sep 2010, 01:21

I agree with the other posts. Definitely try to research the other side of your family. I never thought I would be able to apply because I didn't have any documents from my ancestors. I didn't even know the towns they were exactly from in Italy. But I was able to find the information a lot easier than I could have ever imagined. I joined ancestry.com and within a few hours I knew the exact town my GGF was born in. I emailed the "comune" (it helps to speak Italian) and I had copies of their birth certificates in less than 2 weeks!

I highly recommend searching on ancestry.com - they have free trials. In my experience, the documents (besides standard birth and marriage certificates) that are most likely to have birth places are draft registration cards, ship manifests, and naturalization/alien files. Have you done a search with the USCIS for your ancestor? It takes a while but if they have any records, you can request the record and most likely it will have a birth place on it.

Good luck searching!


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