Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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sceaminmonkey
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Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby sceaminmonkey » 30 Sep 2010, 22:16

My parents have been married over 30 years. My mom is the italian one. If my Dad registers their marriage and since he qualifies can he become italian? and will it be considering being naturalized in another country? can he lose american citizenship by doing so?

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby johnnyonthespot » 30 Sep 2010, 22:28

Yes, sort of. Yes, definitely. No.

If it were the other way around - if your father was the Italian side and he and your mom married prior to April 27, 1983, then she would have automatically become an Italian citizen at the moment the vows were complete. All that would need to be done is for your father to register the marriage and your mom can collect her passport.

However, this is a one-way street and does not work the same for men who married Italian women. Your father will have to apply for citizenship jus matrimoni. It is a much more involved process which includes criminal background checks at the federal (FBI), state, and local level and a €200 fee paid in advance of filing the application. Then, a wait of generally close to two years. See http://www.consnewyork.esteri.it/NR/exe ... =Published

Finally, citizenship jus matrimoni is - if I recall correctly - actually a form of naturalization. Nevertheless, it would have no impact on your father's US citizenship. He would be a dual US-Italian citizen, no different from you or me.
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sceaminmonkey
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Re: Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby sceaminmonkey » 30 Sep 2010, 22:33

wow two years? and thanks for the info I would like for him to become a citizen after my mother is recognized.

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corrado
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Re: Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby corrado » 02 Oct 2010, 16:47

its two years and there is no way to speed that up, you just have to do it.

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sceaminmonkey
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Re: Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby sceaminmonkey » 02 Oct 2010, 17:17

Is it two years of being married is required? Bc they have been married over 30 years. So it just takes two Years to register ?

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Re: Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby mler » 02 Oct 2010, 17:42

Your dad can apply for citizenship immediately after your mom's citizenship is recognized. He has already met the two year requirement. The procedure for his application, however, is different. Check your consulate's web page for instructions.

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Re: Will becoming an italian by marriage affect citizenship?

Postby johnnyonthespot » 02 Oct 2010, 18:12

sceaminmonkey wrote:Is it two years of being married is required? Bc they have been married over 30 years. So it just takes two Years to register ?


This type of citizenship is handled entirely differently than your own jus sanguinis case.

In jus sanguinis cases, the consulate processes the application, makes the final decision, etc, etc.

In jus matrimoni cases, the consulate's role is simply to review the application to ensure it is in order and to ensure that the requisite €200 fee has been paid. The consulate then forwards everything to Rome where the case is investigated and the final decision is made. By law, Rome has two full years to do so; reports have been that they tend to use up most of that time...
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