My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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amaglioc
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My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby amaglioc » 12 Oct 2010, 23:27

I learned so much about this process here that I feel obligated to share, though my impression is that the Houston Consulate is the exception in many ways to this process, almost certainly because they are not as overwhelmed with appointments as other offices.

It took around 14 months to gather my documents (mainly because New York State wasn't very cooperative), and because my grandparents' marriage certificate was missing. We never found the marriage certificate for them, though we gathered a great deal of supporting evidence.
I claimed through the grandfather-father line.

Also, I used Sandra Luciano with italianamericancitizenship.com to help me with much of the process. She was brilliant and a joy to work with. While it would have been possible to do this without her expertise, it would have taken me five times longer, and I very likely would have let the project drop at some point. Like many of you, I'm very busy and not everything can be a priority. Sandra not only kept the process moving, but she buoyed my flagging spirits on more than one occasion.

Okay, on to the appointment day. First of all, Houston isn't hard to schedule. They gave us a date about 10 days out. I drove down from Dallas the night before and walked into their very well-appointed suite about 9:10 AM on Tuesday Sep 28. The waiting area is like a doctor's office with a group of chairs to the right and a receptionist's window straight ahead. On the left are two secure "booths" with thick glass to separate "customer" from official, and I worried that I would have to meet Dr. Daniele Ansaldo, the citizenship officer, in that stuffy little space. I was hoping for more comfortable environs to explain everything we'd found in lieu of the marriage document. I was very worried about the marriage.

Happily I was called back to his office where he greeted me warmly and asked for my documents one at a time. He started with my grandfather's birth, which I had, and then asked for the marriage. I responded by showing him, one after another, all the documents we found instead of the marriage. These included "No records" from the Frosinone commune for a number of years, as well as letters from surrounding communes in Lazio confirming that they also had no record. Then I showed him US immigration papers where my grandmother is listed as my grandfather's wife, and also the 1920 and 1930 census forms listing them as married. I had photocopied the full census page and stapled to it a magnification of the lines on which their names appeared. I had highlighted their names in yellow. Dr. Ansaldo studied this quite carefully and said, "It's okay." I actually had a few more documents to show him in case those didn’t work. I think he saw there was more coming. My *guess* is that the “NO RECORDâ€

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Re: My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby beauac » 12 Oct 2010, 23:40

Thanks for sharing that. By the way just so I dont make the same mistakes what is the difference between a long and short form of a certificate?

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Re: My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby amaglioc » 12 Oct 2010, 23:47

Well, from a legal standpoint I'm not entirely sure and my guess is it varies from state to state. But for New York, at least in 1969, the "long form" contained much more information than the short form.

The short form lists only the "full name of child", "date of birth", place of birth, maiden name of mother, name of father, date filed, and state file number.

The long form listed hospital, doctor, time of day, and all sorts of other data. I think the thing to do is confirm with the issuing agency that you are getting the full long form certificate.

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Re: My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby johnnyonthespot » 13 Oct 2010, 00:40

Congratulations, Amos! Great job and great write-up.

Beau, see this thread for eamples of New York long vs. short form birth certificates: http://www.italiangenealogy.com/Forums/ ... c/t=17995/
Carmine

My hobby is finding things. Having found most of my own, I am happy to help others find theirs. PM me! :)

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Re: My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby beauac » 13 Oct 2010, 01:15

Oh ok, thanks for that. I am sure I only have long forms. I dont think they come in short forms around here, I have never seen one.

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Re: My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby jgenduso » 13 Oct 2010, 19:12

Congrats Amos.

After 14 months of a 20 month San Francisco wait, I am envious of your 10 day out appointment.

You seemed to be well prepared. I am very glad it was smoothly for you.

All the best - Joseph
Joseph F Genduso, PMP, MEng, MBA

Researching Genduso, Lo Re, Cagnina, Gallina, Mancuso, Mazzarisi, Panzica, Fratallone and Trombello in Resuttano (CL), Sicily

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Re: My experience at Houston Consulate, 2010 Sep 28

Postby amaglioc » 18 Jun 2011, 04:13

I think the transition of this board to new software caused my original message to be corrupted. The last few paragraphs are missing. I'll summarize them here:

The only problem in my appointment was that I'd failed to have the "long form" birth certificate for MYSELF translated. I'd translated the short form cert. I had both the long and short form with me, but translated the wrong one, in other words. I made a super-quick trip to the Italian Chamber of Commerce in Houston (happily very close by) and they were incredibly gracious to do a translation on the spot (charging me for the expedited service of course) and I returned to the consulate before they closed.

About a month later I got the letter, and registered with AIRE.

Today I finally received my birth registration documents from my home commune, after two letters over seven months. However, in the first letter I failed to include an SASE, and that might have delayed the process. Now I'm preparing for the passport appointment at the Houston Consulate in August.


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