Naturalization papers

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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nagnello
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Naturalization papers

Postby nagnello » 25 Oct 2010, 20:29

I have not been able to find info on my GGrandfathers naturalization. His name is Antonino Agnello, although he did use Tony Angelo on census records in 1900, 1910. He was born in Feb 1849 in Sicily, Vicari maybe. He immigrated in 1887, or 1888. He lived in Chicago until his death in 1923. Wife's name was Nelly, children, Jenny, Mary, Thomas and Sam, my grandfather. I am trying to establish when he was naturalized, and maybe his wife and first 3 children also. Sam was born in Chicago in 1899.

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ricbru
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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby ricbru » 26 Oct 2010, 20:16

On 1900 and 1910 census he stated to be already naturalized
ciao Riccardo

http://yfrog.com/mh73649300j

http://yfrog.com/6333146351j

If you think about getting your italian citizenship, you cant apply because he naturalized before 1912

I hope it helps
bye Riccardo

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nagnello
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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby nagnello » 27 Oct 2010, 02:27

I was not worried about dual citizenship, just looking for his naturalization papers.

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ricbru
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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby ricbru » 27 Oct 2010, 08:15

For naturalization papers contact USCIS, Nara of Washington DC, and local court house close to where he lived.
I hope it helps
bye Riccardo

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Tessa78
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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby Tessa78 » 27 Oct 2010, 10:18

I am trying to establish when he was naturalized, and maybe his wife and first 3 children also. Sam was born in Chicago in 1899.


Based on the 1920 Census, he and Nellie were naturalized in 1898.

This Naturalization Index Card record on Ancestry shows a naturalization date of March 22, 1898 - IF this is your ancestor ...

http://img816.imageshack.us/img816/747/ ... atcard.jpg

T.

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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby maestra36 » 27 Oct 2010, 12:09

what about the fact that the card reads "minor 18 years"-does that mean this Antonio was born in 1870? if so, then this could not be the Antonino born in 1849.

For your information-In 1898, Nellie would have been naturalized, if her husband acquired naturalization, but would not have had separate papers. Her name, however, would not be listed on his naturalization papers. Also if they had any children born in Italy, under the age of 18, those children also would have automatically been naturalized, if their father was, under what was called "derivative citizenship."

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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby nagnello » 28 Oct 2010, 00:48

I did find that Antonino Agnello, but he was a minor. I believe this was a son of my great-grandfathers brother. They both lived on Milton in Chicago. I don't really trust all the info on the 1900 census. First the immigration dates from 1910 and 1920 are different, and they have a daughter listed as Sadie, but her name was Mary, right birth year. Also birth months are wrong according to death certs. I have. A few lines up is another Angelo, with daughters with the same names. Very confusing, but thanks for all the help.

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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby dmbozza » 01 Nov 2010, 14:44

Is a photocopy of my Grandfathers certificate of US Citizenship suficiant for dual citizenship purposes? It's issued from the department of labor and includes both his petition # and a certificate #, his photograph and you can clearly see that it had an embossed raised stamp at the time the photo copy was taken.

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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby johnnyonthespot » 01 Nov 2010, 15:00

For nagnello: USCIS (the United States Citizenship & Immigration Service) has no naturalization records for the period prior to Septermber 27 (?), 1906. Earlier records - if you can find them at all - will most likely be at the county court or archives for the county in which he was residing at the time of naturalization. You may also find them at the National Archives ( http://www.archives.gov )

Naturalization records for the period before 1906 can be nearly useless, as they usually contain very little information. Inquiring about a Connecticut record from 1902, for example, I recently learned that the available record is little more than an index which states the new citizen's name, address, date of birth, and previous citizenship - and not very much more.

For bmbozza: Can I assume that you have the original certificate and want to submit a photocopy? If so, take the origianl along to your consulate appointment; they will examine it and if satisfied make a photocopy and then return the original to you.

If you don't have the original, then you should go to the USCIS website and order your ancestor's "C File". The C File number is the letter "C" followed by the seven-digit certificate number which appears on the document. Start here http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/ ... 2ca60aRCRD and click the "Order Online Now" link at the top right of the page. Select Record Request and click Next at the bottom. You can bypass the Index Search requirement since you already have the certificate/C File number.

You can also give the National Archives a shot. The National Archives is both an inexpensive and fast way to obtaiin naturalization docs; unfortunately for many parts of the country, NARA only holds naturalization records from the federal courts. Start here https://eservices.archives.gov/orderonl ... chives.gov and click Order Reproductions, then Immigration & Naturalization Records. There is no charge unless they find a record and only a very reasonable charge if they do ($7.50 for non-certified, $22.50 for certified copies).

Keep in mind that only USCIS can provide copies of the actual Certificate of Naturalization. The National Archives - if they have your ancestor's records - will send you the Declaration of Intent and the Petition for Naturalization which includes the Oath of Allegiance; this last document will more than satisfy the consulate's requirements. Be sure to order the certified copies.
Carmine

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dmbozza
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Re: Naturalization papers

Postby dmbozza » 12 Nov 2010, 00:21

Carmine,

Thank you for your input... can you offer any advise as to how I should handle a name discrepancy that I just discovered.

It appears that my Grandfathers name on his Italian Birth Record and US naturalization record is Pasquale Bozza, however every other document that I've obtained... Marriage Certificate, Death Certificate, Social Security Records and even my Dads Birth Certificate his name is listed as Patsy Bozza.


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