Dual Citizenship Question

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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Afonti
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Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Afonti » 14 Feb 2011, 03:13

I am in the very first steps of thinking about applying for Dual Citizenship. My great grandfather immigrated to the US but I can not find any naturalization records anywhere except on the 1930's census it states he is NA.
What happens in the case that the only record indicating Naturalization is one census?

Where else can I look?

Any info would be much appreciated

Andrea

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Drew927 » 14 Feb 2011, 06:51

Andrea,
Where have you looked for his Naturalization documents? Have you looked for his ship manifest? The manifest will have a naturalization number written on it that you can use to help find it.
Drew

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Afonti » 14 Feb 2011, 12:12

I have checked with family. No one knows when he was naturalized or has any records of the paperwork. I have searched every possible site I can find ancestry, family history center, etc...
The only info I can find is on the 1930's census that indicates he was NA. This is the census for Falconer, NY
I also sent in a request for a document search with one fo the gov websites. In addition I am waiting for his social security application.

Where on the ship manifest does it indicate his number in regards to naturalization and if I find it where do I look at from there?

My GGF (Filippo (Phillip) Fonti) arrived Oct 21, 1913 on the Berlin Ship out of Naples Italy.

In advance thank you for your reply! :)

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Drew927 » 14 Feb 2011, 15:38

The number should be written on the page next to his name. You should also send a search request to the NARA northeast region in NYC. They will send you a certified copy of the 1930 census as well as certified copies of his naturalization papers.

Try sending a search request to the USCIS at this address:

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
ATTN: Records Service Branch
1200 First Street NE, 2nd Floor
Washington, D.C. 20529-2204

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Drew927 » 14 Feb 2011, 15:50

I found his ship manifest and it does not list a naturalization number.

He was 17 years old and listed his last residence as Aguila.

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Afonti
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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Afonti » 14 Feb 2011, 16:15

Yes I was going to say I have looked at his manifest intently and I do not recall a naturalization number. What does that mean?

Thank you so much for your assistance. All of this can be a bit overwhelming as a newbie.

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Drew927 » 14 Feb 2011, 16:55

It doesn't mean much. There was just a chance it would be there. My Grandmother also did not have her number on the manifest.

Try the NARA and USCIS. You can also check with the local town or county clerks office where your GGF lived. I found a naturalization for my wifes grandfather there when the NARA said they had no record.
Good luck

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby johnnyonthespot » 14 Feb 2011, 16:57

Afonti,

If he arrived after 1906 and naturalized after 1912, you would expect to see notations on his manifest of the "Certificate of Arrival" number (not naturalization certificate) and date of issue. This was due to procedures implemented effective 1912 which required a petitioner for naturalization to prove that he entered the US legally.

I suggest you begin by placing an order with the National Archives using the information you have available and see what turns up. NARA responds quickly, often within a week, and will not charge you if they do not locate a record. The only downside to NARA is that, for most of the US, they only hold naturalization records from the federal courts and not from state or county courts. Still, it is definitely worth a shot.

To place a document order, start here https://eservices.archives.gov/orderonl ... chives.gov and go ahead and create an account on the right. Next, click "Order Reproductions" and then "Immigration & Naturalization Records"

When completing the order form, you may encounter fields which demand you enter something even though you don't have the information available; just put X's or 9's in those fields and continue.

Note: if they do have the records, you are going to want to request the "Certified Paper Copy" which will cost you a total of $22.50 (assuming this is about jus sanguinis citizenship).

For all naturalizations after September 27, 1906, the most reliable sorce of records - no matter what level court may have been involved - is the United States Citizenship & Immigration Service ("USCIS"). The negative factor is USCIS is more costly and orders of magnitude slower to respond than other sources. Start here and request an "Index Search" ( http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/ ... 18190aRCRD ). If the Index Search turns up a citizenship file ("C" File), then you would follow up with a "Records Request" to obtain the actual documents.
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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby johnnyonthespot » 14 Feb 2011, 16:59

You may wish to look here http://www.co.chautauqua.ny.us/departme ... rkfaq.aspx as well:

What records are available from the County Clerk, in researching my genealogy, "my family tree"?

The County Clerk has state Census records (1825 to 1925), naturalization records (1814 to 1972), marriage records (1908 to 1935), property deeds and mortgages (1811-present), and tax assessment records (1854 to 1934). Birth, marriage and death records, also known as vital records, are available from the Town or City Clerk where the event occurred. In New York State, vital records were first kept starting in 1881.
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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby Afonti » 14 Feb 2011, 17:25

Wow!! You have no idea how much I appreciate the replies and guidance as to where to look. On Feb 4th I did request and index search with USCIS. Any idea how long that takes?

Next I will try NARA and the county clerk in Chautauqua County.

If nothing does exist, then would the consulate go by the census date of 1930 as the naturalization date when I apply for dual citizenship?

Also I am going F to GF to GGF. But is it possible to go F to GF to GGM to GGGF?

Thanks
Andrea

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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby johnnyonthespot » 14 Feb 2011, 17:40

Afonti wrote:Wow!! You have no idea how much I appreciate the replies and guidance as to where to look. On Feb 4th I did request and index search with USCIS. Any idea how long that takes?


USCIS can take several months for each step. Hopefully you will get quick results from NARA or the county clerk's office.

If nothing does exist, then would the consulate go by the census date of 1930 as the naturalization date when I apply for dual citizenship?


No, absolutely not. Instead, you would have to go on the assumption that he did not, in fact, naturalize regardless of what the one census indicates. You would need various letters of "No Record Found" from the USCIS, NARA, state and county court archives as proof of your claim that GGF never gave up his Italian citizenship.

Also I am going F to GF to GGF. But is it possible to go F to GF to GGM to GGGF?


Only if your GF was born on or after January 1, 1948. Prior to that date, Italian citizenship was passed only by the father, so GF could not have inherited citizenship from his mother.

Thanks
Andrea


You're welcome! :D
Carmine

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musaccosteve
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Re: Dual Citizenship Question

Postby musaccosteve » 14 Feb 2011, 19:15

Has anyone recently requested an inquiry from the USCIS address below? If so, how long did it take?

Thank you,
Steve

Drew927 wrote:
Try sending a search request to the USCIS at this address:

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
ATTN: Records Service Branch
1200 First Street NE, 2nd Floor
Washington, D.C. 20529-2204


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