Success in Houston

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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Success in Houston

Postby ianiro » 25 Mar 2011, 03:31

I received my citizenship through the Houston Consulate a month or so ago and just thought I would make a post in case anyone has questions about Houston, the process, or how I did things.

Also, if anyone needs a referral for a good person to do their translations, I can provide that.
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby jalapeno89 » 26 Mar 2011, 17:49

i have my appointment in Houston on April 5, i am nervous is there anything that i should know going in?
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby ianiro » 27 Mar 2011, 08:13

jalapeno89 wrote:i have my appointment in Houston on April 5, i am nervous is there anything that i should know going in?

I assume your appointment is with Daniel Ansaldo. He is a very nice and helpful person, and the appointment is very quick and straightforward. You will sit down and go over the documents one at a time verifying dates, and that is it. Make sure you have your drivers license with you, and I'd bring your passport just in case they want to see an additional ID. Other than that the appointment will last 30 minutes or so, then you will be done. Following the appointment you just have to wait until you get a letter stating you are now recognized as an Italian citizen, assuming they don't need any additional information or there is an issue.

Just a few tips, organize your paperwork from the oldest person in your family line on down to you, because this is the order he will ask for things, and make sure you have the translations correctly paired with each corresponding record. As long as you have all the correct records, apostilles, and translations, you will be set.

If you need anything else, just ask.
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby dalemma » 27 Mar 2011, 16:07

Hey Congrats,

I actually DO have a question about Houston. I had a meeting in Detroit and discovered that because I was born in Texas, I need to have the Houston Consulate approve a translation for my birth certificate. Does this sound familiar to anyone? I thought I saw a post here recently about someone with a similar predicament for California. Am I supposed to do the translation? Will THEY do some sort of Official translation? Any advice please... Oh yeah, my meeting went well, just some housekeeping issues!! Thanks in advance!
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby Traveler7 » 29 Mar 2011, 02:17

Just out of curiosity, how long did you have to wait to get an appointment at the Houston Consulate?
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby jalapeno89 » 29 Mar 2011, 03:45

i made my appointment two weeks ago for April 5th.. it seems like there are not any people in Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas or Oklahoma going through this process... they replied very quickly and the meeting was only three weeks away and i was able to pick the time and date... Some other people have said they waited years at other consulates...
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby Drew927 » 29 Mar 2011, 12:38

dalemma,
During my appointment in New York, I was informed that my daughter's birth certificate from California needed to be sent to the Italian Consulate within the the jurisdiction of the County of Birth. I called the Los Angeles Consulate and spoke with the Notary dept. They informed me of the required fee and address for the Certification of this document. I sent the Apostilled document along with the translation and they returned it with all the papers stapled together, signed and stamped.

I hope this helps,
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby dalemma » 29 Mar 2011, 19:19

Hey thanks a ton a Drew!!

dalemma
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby ianiro » 19 Apr 2011, 05:14

Traveler7 wrote:Just out of curiosity, how long did you have to wait to get an appointment at the Houston Consulate?


When I contacted the consulate to set up my appointment he just asked me to pick a day to come in and let him know. I picked one, emailed it to him and he confirmed it. That was it. I picked the first day I could make it down to Houston which was two weeks later.
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby NOLATom » 21 Apr 2011, 00:12

Traveler7 wrote:Just out of curiosity, how long did you have to wait to get an appointment at the Houston Consulate?


My situation was almost identical. I requested a day via email and was given a two week range to choose a day from and confirm. I chose a date two weeks away so the flight would not be too expensive. At first I received no confirmation as the day of my flight got closer, so I emailed again and was confirmed. When I showed up, they asked if I was sure I had an appointment. I said yes. They then came back to the window and asked again and my answer was still yes (though I was doubting myself now). After that they saw me and the rest is history.

When you request an appointment, you better have all your documentation ready, because there seems to be no waiting period.
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby Squigy » 21 Apr 2011, 00:52

I have a question; I'm applying at the Houston Consulate, also (I'm supposed to be moving to Texas, soon) and was wondering about translations. Someone was kind enough to send me a translation template for PA birth records (my whole family is from PA) but will this work in Houston? Or do I have to have a certified translator translate them for me? This person (who applied in D.C.) also said he ONLY needed his OWN birth cert. translated, is that the way it works in Houston, too?

Also, this doesn't have to do with the Houston Consulate, but my great grandfather went by Andrew Maietta on all his records, but on his father's nat record, he was listed as Andrea. Would I have to get any documents amended or would the Consulate accept this?

Thanks!!
My Italian surnames:

Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone

Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile

Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby NOLATom » 21 Apr 2011, 05:03

Squigy wrote:I have a question; I'm applying at the Houston Consulate, also (I'm supposed to be moving to Texas, soon) and was wondering about translations. Someone was kind enough to send me a translation template for PA birth records (my whole family is from PA) but will this work in Houston? Or do I have to have a certified translator translate them for me? This person (who applied in D.C.) also said he ONLY needed his OWN birth cert. translated, is that the way it works in Houston, too?

Also, this doesn't have to do with the Houston Consulate, but my great grandfather went by Andrew Maietta on all his records, but on his father's nat record, he was listed as Andrea. Would I have to get any documents amended or would the Consulate accept this?

Thanks!!


No where on my translations did it say certified or have the name of the translator, but I did pay someone to translate them. Which they did make a mistake on and the consulate just crossed through it and corrected it. They only took documents on the direct line, but you will need all documents in the direct line apostilled and translated. Actually, here are the instructions from the Houston consulate, which tells you exactly what's needed and where to get it translated.

Consulate General of Italy
Houston

Required documents (please follow these instructions STRICTLY):

Birth certificate of the Ancestor born in Italy, issued by the relevant Comune ( Municipality)
Marriage certificate including the “application for marriage license”; (in case of more than one marriage, all the certificates are to be submitted, along with relevant sentences of divorce)
certificate of naturalization if the ancestor got a citizenship different from the Italian one. If not, a statement by US Authorities (both INS and NARA- National Archives and Records Adm.), stating that Mr.... never applied for US citizenship.
Death certificate (if applicable)
......and so on, for all the descendants, till the concerned person (applicant).
The original documents should be in the “Long Form”. The “Long form” is the format containing the highest number of data (i.e.: a birth certificate bearing only name of the child, place and date of birth, parents’ names is NOT a long form).
All the certificates issued in the U.S. or in one of the Countries which signed the LaHague Convention in 1961 (i.e.: Argentina, Venezuela etc.) must have the relevant Apostille. Documents issued in other Countries (i.e.: Brazil) must be legalized by the Italian Consulate in that Country.
If the language of the original certificate is not Italian, the document must be translated into Italian and the translation must be certified by the Italian Consulate of the Country where the certificate comes from.
For the translation of documents issued in USA, please contact the ITALY-AMERICA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TEXAS (Tel. 713 626 9303).
Also a photocopy of the applicant’s driving licence is requested.

I had far greater typos on my records than Andrew versus Andrea and I had lots of supporting documents and an affidavit, but they did not take any of it, so I would say leave it as is and if they want it amended, they will tell you.
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby Squigy » 21 Apr 2011, 05:39

Thanks so much! This is a BIG help!


So what you're saying is, I only need direct line documents, but ALL the American ones have to be translated? So, for instance, since I'm getting citizenship through my mother's ancestry, I don't need my father's birth record?
My Italian surnames:

Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone

Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile

Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby ianiro » 21 Apr 2011, 06:02

Squigy wrote:I have a question; I'm applying at the Houston Consulate, also (I'm supposed to be moving to Texas, soon) and was wondering about translations. Someone was kind enough to send me a translation template for PA birth records (my whole family is from PA) but will this work in Houston? Or do I have to have a certified translator translate them for me? This person (who applied in D.C.) also said he ONLY needed his OWN birth cert. translated, is that the way it works in Houston, too?

Also, this doesn't have to do with the Houston Consulate, but my great grandfather went by Andrew Maietta on all his records, but on his father's nat record, he was listed as Andrea. Would I have to get any documents amended or would the Consulate accept this?

Thanks!!


You do not need to have Certified translations, but I'd definitely recommend paying someone to do it anyway. The woman I used is in sacramento, ca, and she did an excellent job and got it done very quickly. If you would like her information send me a note and ill give it to you. She charges a very reasonable fee.
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Re: Success in Houston

Postby NOLATom » 21 Apr 2011, 06:21

Squigy wrote:Thanks so much! This is a BIG help!


So what you're saying is, I only need direct line documents, but ALL the American ones have to be translated? So, for instance, since I'm getting citizenship through my mother's ancestry, I don't need my father's birth record?



You're welcome.

To answer your questions, Yes and Yes. I had everyone's documents with apostille and translation, but they did not even want to look at them. They only want direct line as they say in the "scheme", which I found on the website. I'll paste it below. Notice it says Mother or Father (whichever one you're claiming through) and only those. They will ask for them one by one, write the info down and put it in a folder. Just that simple.



Specimen of information to be submitted on requesting the guide lines

Grand father (or great-grand father or simply father : any male ancestor born in Italy*):
information: full name
place and date of birth
place and date of marriage
place and date of death
place and date of naturalization (if applicable)**



father or mother (it depends on which ancestor is taken into consideration):
information: full name (maiden name for women)
place and date of birth
place and date of marriage
place and date of death
place and date of naturalization (if applicable)



applicant:
information: full name (maiden name for women)
place and date of birth
place and date of marriage (if applicable)
place and date of US (or other Country) naturalization (if applicable)
current address and, for non US citizen: copy of US visa/ green card and driver license.


* female ancestors can pass on the Italian citizenship only to offspring born after Jan. 1, 1948.

** if the ancestor never naturalized, please write that he did not
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