*** There is a problem with new registrations - Contact us when you did not receive an activation email ***

Translations for Documents

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
10 posts • Page 1 of 1

Translations for Documents

Postby newuser123 » 28 Dec 2011, 03:27

I now have all my documents with the apostille's to apply for citizenship. What is the next step? I read on here that I have to have a certified translator and that the translations have to be legalized? Who legalizes translations and how do I know if someone is a certified translator? Are the apostille translated or the original documents only. I will be applying either at the Boston or NY consulate or in Italy itself because I might move soon.

Thank you for your help.

Michael
User avatar
newuser123
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 15
Joined: 03 Jan 2011, 00:54

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby kontessa » 28 Dec 2011, 18:23

Hopefully someone with recent experience will respond to your questions. In the meantime, you could confirm the translation requirements for both Boston and NY by searching on their respective websites. Unless the consulate specifies that you must choose someone from their own list of approved translators, you should be able to select your own.

Next, it may be likely that you will need to have the translations legalized and/or the documents authenticated (especially if documents originate outside of the jurisdiction of the consulate where you apply). This requirement should also be posted on the consular web pages, and if not it's best to search for posts from recent applicants. The consulates legalize/authenticate documents and I think that it is now the applicants responsibility to submit the documents to the consulate for this to be done. (There is a wealth of information on italiancitizenship.freeforums.org, btw, if no one responds here. :wink:

Next, if you decide to apply in Italy you can have your translations done in the US, but they must be legalized by a US consulate in order to use them in Italy. Also, you must have everything apostilled and translated - including naturalization documents.

You may also opt to have the translations done by someone in Italy, but they will then need to be legalized at the local courthouse. Requirements for translations may vary by comune - usually the office in the courthouse responsible for legalizing the translations will instruct you on how to proceed.

I applied for citizenship in Italy, and had a friend do my translations. My friend was required to swear to the authenticity of the translations and then a number of tax stamps were applied to the translations in order for them to be legalized. Everything was translated, including the apostilles. (I don't believe that translating the apostille is required stateside, but my local courthouse official required it.) I also think that the cost for legalizing translations at a consulate in the US should be comparable to what you might pay in Italy. (I recall having to have one tax stamp for every 4th page - counting front and back of document.) If you need additional information about requirements for applying in Italy, just ask.

Another thing to remember...authenticating documents seems to be the norm for applicants now, even when applying in Italy. I can't say with certainty whether EVERY comuni in Italy sends your documents back to the consulate in the US for authentication, but mine did. I believe that others applying in Italy have experienced the same. So, it might be a better idea to have your translations done in the US, have them legalized and then try to have everything authenticated before you depart.

Good luck!
User avatar
kontessa
Elite
Elite
 
Posts: 304
Joined: 16 Apr 2010, 19:05

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby newuser123 » 30 Dec 2011, 03:31

Okay so to anyone who has done it recently, all my documents are from NYC, but I believe I am applying in Boston. I have all my documents so how do I go having the translations legalized and/or the documents authenticated by the NY consulate. Is this another 11 month appt wait or do I just show up at the consulate and pay. Will this be easier if I hire a NY consulate translator.

I went to NY consulate website, this is what was there.
2. INFORMATION FOR NON-RESIDENTS
If you are not a legal resident in the jurisdiction of the Italian Consulate in New York (New York City, State of New York, State of Connecticut and British Territories of Bermuda Islands) your application for citizenship must be filed with the appropriate Consular Office or the Town Hall in Italy of where you reside.

However, if your documents are issued in New York City, in the State of New York, in the State of Connecticut and in the British Territories of Bermuda Islands, you must obtain from U.S. Vital Records Offices the appropriate certificates that are in accordance with the Law. All documents must bear an Apostille of the Secretary of State of the State where the document was issued. They must be submitted directly to the Consular Office with jurisdiction over your place of residence with a certified notarized translation, legalized with the Apostille.

I don't understand what the last sentence means. Does that translator have to get the documents notarized (translator signature) or do I (my signature)? Do I get the translations apostilled or do I get the apostilled translated or both?

Kontessa, is this what you mean by authenticated? a certified notarized translation, legalized with the Apostille.


Thank you Kontessa, someone else also recommended that site (italiancitizenship.freeforums.org) so I am going to go hunting.

When you applied in Italy did you hire a lawyer or do it yourself? My Italian is NOT fluent.
User avatar
newuser123
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 15
Joined: 03 Jan 2011, 00:54

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby rjnigro » 30 Dec 2011, 16:20

"Authenticating" and getting an "Apostille" are two different things.

Documents such as BC/DC/MC require an Apostille from the US jurisdiction from whence they came. A NY issued BC requires a NY issued Apostille. A Florida issued DC requires a Florida issued Apostille.

"Authenticating" or some use the term "legalizing" is something else and is in addition to the Apostille. If the BC/DC/MC was issued by a state government not falling under the jurisdiction of the Consulate at which you are applying,does documents will have to be presented to the Consulate which has jurisdiction where the documents were issued. That Consulate will "authenticate" them fundamentally saying, with a seal, they are good and real. So if you are applying in NY and in support of your application you have documents issued by a municipality in Mass., those documents will have to be "authenticated" by the consulate in Boston prior to being presented with your application in NY.

If you are applying in Italy, all of your US issued documents will have to be authenticated by the appropriate Consulate(s)
rjnigro
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 74
Joined: 15 Jun 2011, 14:24

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby JJ313 » 30 Dec 2011, 18:07

Michael,

I have been through the process of having NYC documents authenticated by the NY consulate. Send your apostilled and translated documents to the consulate with a letter to the citizenship department requesting that they authenticate your documents for use in another consulate. The fee is currently $8.50 per translated page and can be paid via a credit card ($4.00 one-time processing fee) or money order. The fee changes quarterly and will change 1/1. The fee is posted on the NY website in their tariff schedule and is Art. 71a. NY requires a release from any liability for documents being lost in transit. It has been posted a few times, PM me if you can't find it. Include a SASE for the return of your documents and a copy of your photo ID. The process door to door took 35 days.

I self-translated my documents and all were accepted except for my marriage certificate. I had translated both pages of the document verbatim and NY substituted their own one-page translation which is basically a consolidation of both pages. Apostilles are not translated; only the documents are translated. Certified translators are not required, however using one recommended by the consulate will expedite your request.
JJ313
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 159
Joined: 07 Aug 2011, 06:25

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby kontessa » 30 Dec 2011, 20:30

newuser123 wrote: When you applied in Italy did you hire a lawyer or do it yourself? My Italian is NOT fluent.


I had been living in Italy for 8+ years when I submitted my application, and didn't feel that I required the assistance of an attorney. I would think that if you had a friend or acqaintance that spoke Italian that could accompany you to the various comune offices, that you would not need an attorney to assist you.
User avatar
kontessa
Elite
Elite
 
Posts: 304
Joined: 16 Apr 2010, 19:05

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby newuser123 » 31 Dec 2011, 19:02

What is a SASE? Where do I get one? Thank you

Michael
User avatar
newuser123
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 15
Joined: 03 Jan 2011, 00:54

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby KarenChristino » 31 Dec 2011, 19:14

Thank goodness a few things are simple! A SASE = Self Addressed Stamped Envelope (abbreviation used a lot for writers) so you can make one yourself. :)
User avatar
KarenChristino
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 202
Joined: 19 Jul 2010, 14:26
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby newuser123 » 31 Dec 2011, 20:26

Thank you Karen, hey, what part of Brooklyn do you live, I used to live in Marine PArk by Kings Plaza.
User avatar
newuser123
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 15
Joined: 03 Jan 2011, 00:54

Re: Translations for Documents

Postby KarenChristino » 02 Jan 2012, 03:26

We lived in Carroll Gardens for 25+ years, but it's changed radically and is no longer nearly as authentically Italian as it was when I moved in. We just moved further out in Brooklyn to the Prospect Park South area, only a few miles actually from where my GGF and GF lived when a lot of this area was developed nearly 100 years ago!
User avatar
KarenChristino
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 202
Joined: 19 Jul 2010, 14:26
Location: Brooklyn, NY


10 posts • Page 1 of 1

Return to Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests

Copyright © 2014. www.ItalianGenealogy.com.