Question on Apostille and translation

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
6 posts • Page 1 of 1

Question on Apostille and translation

Postby montclaire » 19 Oct 2012, 20:42

Hello, I have a question on application dual citizenship. If they call for, say, your parents' marriage certificate (with apostille and translation) - what forms are acceptable as a translation? For instance, can I translate the form myself for submission, or does it have to be done by an outside party? Do both the translated document and the original need to be signed/sealed in an indentical fashion? Is there any issue with the Apostille being in English only, or does that need to be translated as well, and would the translated version need the seal/ribbon, too?
Thanks
User avatar
montclaire
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 138
Joined: 16 Aug 2008, 15:01

Re: Question on Apostille and translation

Postby montclaire » 19 Oct 2012, 21:42

Also, do you need to include your spouse or child? The check list that I have says only "if applicable." I don't know if that means you need to provide docs if you have a spouse/child, or only if you want them to be included on your visa.
User avatar
montclaire
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 138
Joined: 16 Aug 2008, 15:01

Re: Question on Apostille and translation

Postby ktpoloni » 20 Oct 2012, 00:48

Apostilles are done by the state and are in English. They attach a piece of paper with a seal and then attach it to your document with a grommet. You will then attach your translations to the document with a paperclip or something.

From what I have read, translations do not need to be certified. I'm going through the San Francisco Consulate and that is their case. If you are fluent in Italian and feel like you can translate the document how they are wanting it then go for it- but you run the risk of getting your application rejected for poor translations. I recommend using someone on the list of translators the consulate recommends. I did this, and the translator was very thorough, especially when it comes to seals, and just the whole set up of the document since they know how the consulate wants them.

If you have minor children, you will need to present their birth certificates, apostilled, and translated as well. If you are married you will need apostilled, translated of your marriage certificate. Usually you only need a photocopy of your spouses birth certificate. But again, all of this depends on the consulate.
ktpoloni
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 40
Joined: 26 May 2012, 02:34

Re: Question on Apostille and translation

Postby montclaire » 20 Oct 2012, 03:21

Ok, that makes sense. How do they translate the seals, do they provide a description of venue perhaps?

Also, is there a time limit on submitting the paperwork? I will need to petition for several amendments due to variations in name, which of couse will take time. I am going to start with the BCs in Italy, and go from there. If I have some apostilles dated 2012 and with all the red tape I finally submit my application for dual in say 2016, is that an issue?
Thanks
User avatar
montclaire
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 138
Joined: 16 Aug 2008, 15:01

Re: Question on Apostille and translation

Postby ktpoloni » 20 Oct 2012, 15:53

What consulate are you going through?

If I were you, get your documents apostilled last. That way you won't have any problem having an old apostille (even though I don't think they expire). But it is safe in general- you may run into some problems with all your paperwork and then would have spent all that money just certifying a document you can't use. I gathered all the documents I needed, made sure I had everything, and then last week I took them and got all of them apostilled at once to turn in for my appointment in 2 weeks.

Just take it one step at a time. Gather all your documents first, starting with the birth certificate from italy and naturalization records, then move from there. Translations and then apostille last. You have to do the whole process in steps or you will go crazy! Good luck!
ktpoloni
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 40
Joined: 26 May 2012, 02:34

Re: Question on Apostille and translation

Postby montclaire » 20 Oct 2012, 16:17

Good idea, I wouldn't have any issues that way. Does anyone know if they will accept a baptism certificate as a change of name? My grandfather was named Giuseppe, and this is on his birth certificate. All later paperwork is under Joseph. I found his baptismal record and it lists him as Joseph, I am hoping that they will recognize it as a legitimate change of name (it IS from the church) which would save me a ton of work.

My GGM was named Margherite and was adopted prior to coming to the states, so her name is all over the place - changes from her real surname to her adopted surname and back, interchanged Os/As, all kinds of spellings of her first name from Margherite to Margaret. I have read that they focus more on the direct male line so I am hoping they let a lot of it go. That is assuming I can get a documented copy of her BC and adoption papers from the commune.

I will be going through the Philadelphia consulate, however I just found out that we have a local "Consular Correspondent," so I am hoping that he can submit most of my records. I don't know if I would still have to travel to Philadelphia to finalize things or not, I plan to speak with him once I have more in order.
User avatar
montclaire
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 138
Joined: 16 Aug 2008, 15:01


6 posts • Page 1 of 1

Return to Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest

Copyright © 2014. www.ItalianGenealogy.com.