Too far back?

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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Too far back?

Postby ricktodd2 » 02 Aug 2005, 01:17

My grandfather on my mother's side is full italian. So is his father, and his grandfather. So my great great grandfather was born in Italy, but the rest after him were born in America. If I can get all of their birth certificates (probably impossible), can I get Italian citizenship? Or is that just too far back, even if I can prove a direct lineage?
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Re: Too far back?

Postby suanj » 02 Aug 2005, 01:29

for your italian citizenship are necessary the birthact of your great grandfather, and the marriage act ; also certificates of lineage are the proof that your great grandfather was the all issue's head.............suanj
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Re: Too far back?

Postby JamesBianco » 02 Aug 2005, 02:51

ricktodd2 wrote:My grandfather on my mother's side is full italian. So is his father, and his grandfather. So my great great grandfather was born in Italy, but the rest after him were born in America. If I can get all of their birth certificates (probably impossible), can I get Italian citizenship? Or is that just too far back, even if I can prove a direct lineage?


The most important question to determine your eligiblity is who became an American Citizen and when. If your great-great grandfather never became a citizen then you are completely eligible, as his son, being born in America had no reason to denounce his birth right to Italian citizenship and this right would pass to subsequent generations, no matter how far down. If your great-great grandfather became a citizen before the birth of his son, your grandfather, then you would not be eligible, at least through what's called "Juris Sanguinis". You would need then reside in Italy for a period of time, and naturalize that way. Of course you would have an advantage, being of Italian descent and the stay would be shorter than someone who is not. The downfal here is that you would have to take an oath to Italy and this could have ramifications in regards to your US citizenship. Here's a link to a great organization that can assist you in the process.

Bella Consultants

Contacting an attorney specializing in Italian law would be beneficial if you are not eligible through Juris Sanguinis.

Best of luck to you
Jim Bianco :)
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