Questions about Jure Sanguinis

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
oxymoron00
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: 29 Jan 2016, 19:26

Questions about Jure Sanguinis

Postby oxymoron00 » 03 Mar 2016, 19:49

So I've determined already that I am eligible for this (like I have literally covered every base - I know I am eligible) so my questions aren't in regards to that.

I am collecting all of the relevant documents and I suppose I'm a bit confused about these translations and what they must entail and what exactly this Apostille is.

So let's say I have contacted the proper departments and I have my great grandfather's birth certificate on its way to me from Pennsylvania. It is certified and stamped. But I still need a translation, right? How do I find a certified translator?

And after this person translates it, do I need to get it re-stamped with an Apostille, or do I submit both the original certificate AND the translation?

I don't know - I am just utterly confused about this part. What is the process from start to finish, if the starting point is having the certified marriage and/or birth certificate in my hands, and the finish being submitting it to the consulate?

Also: I am having difficulty finding where one of my ancestors is from in Italy and thus have been unable to procure her birth certificate. She is not the person I would have inherited the citizenship from, it was her husband (my great great grandfather) who passed it onto his son. But I know that I still need her birth record; what if I can't find it though? I have her death certificate on its way to me; I hope that provides me with more information (about her parents' names or something) but if it doesn't - what do I do?

Thanks!

JamesM
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 19
Joined: 19 Mar 2015, 00:49
Location: Rhode Island

Re: Questions about Jure Sanguinis

Postby JamesM » 03 Mar 2016, 22:15

Once you have your certified documents, you will have to apsoitlle them in the State they originate from.

The translation is separate. There is usually a section on the consulate's web site with a list of translators. In many instances, you can scan the documents to be translated and the translator will return the paper copies to you, once finished.

Of course, this all depends on the consulate. Some want all the documents translated, others only the ones that pertain to the applicant.
The Boston consulate now wants even the translations to be apostilled.

Which consulate will you be applying at?

oxymoron00
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: 29 Jan 2016, 19:26

Re: Questions about Jure Sanguinis

Postby oxymoron00 » 04 Mar 2016, 04:09

So Apostilled documents aren't the same as certified documents? Like, if I have my father's birth certificate in its original form, an apostille is something different from the stamp that's on there?


And I'm fairly certain I'll have to apply at the Detroit consulate (I live in Ohio).

Cristina319
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 9
Joined: 23 Oct 2011, 23:29

Re: Questions about Jure Sanguinis

Postby Cristina319 » 04 Mar 2016, 10:12

An apostille is more than a certified document. It is an authentication by the secretary of state for documents used in countries that conform to the Hague Convention. You'll need to get certain documents apostilled by the Ohio secretary of state in Columbus....unless the documents are from another state. In that case, then you must have that SOS apostille them.

And, yes, you'll have to apply in Detroit.

jennabet
Master
Master
Posts: 1034
Joined: 14 Jul 2010, 20:28
Location: Ancestral Homeland - Abruzzo Italy

Re: Questions about Jure Sanguinis

Postby jennabet » 04 Mar 2016, 19:18

oxymoron00 wrote:
Also: I am having difficulty finding where one of my ancestors is from in Italy and thus have been unable to procure her birth certificate. She is not the person I would have inherited the citizenship from, it was her husband (my great great grandfather) who passed it onto his son. But I know that I still need her birth record; what if I can't find it though? I have her death certificate on its way to me; I hope that provides me with more information (about her parents' names or something) but if it doesn't - what do I do?

Thanks!


Hi. My companion had a similar problem. His grand-mother was not in his direct line but he was asked to produce her birth certificate from Italy. Since he was not able to locate that document, he submitted the ship manifest showing the record of his grand-mother traveling to America at age nine with her mother and siblings and this was accepted in lieu of her birth certificate.


Return to “Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 4 guests