First Papers and Naturalization

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 07 May 2016, 02:42

I thought it was approximately a five year process from the time an alien filed intent to naturalize (first papers) until he or she received their naturalization papers.

I have my paternal grandfather's naturalization papers, dated Feb 1945, and yet, the 1930 Census indicates PA, that he had already filed his intent.

It's the same story with my great-grandfather. Why would it have taken so long for these two to receive their naturalization papers?
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

James Graham
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 148
Joined: 18 Aug 2014, 16:12
Location: Woodstock, Connecticut

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby James Graham » 07 May 2016, 13:49

I had found my great aunt had submitted, was denied and again tried.
She was accepted the second time around.
It seems to have taken at least 16 years going buy census records and her naturalization date.

erudita74
Master
Master
Posts: 4843
Joined: 27 Aug 2012, 20:26

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby erudita74 » 07 May 2016, 14:43

Naturalization in earlier years was primarily based upon how much time a person had resided in the U.S. In later years, it was based on whether or not the individual could speak English.
Erudita

sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 07 May 2016, 16:53

The 1930 Census indicates that Rocco immigrated to the United States in 1930 and that he could neither read or write. The 1940 Census shows that he had only a 2nd grade education!

I think you're correct Erudita. Rocco's inability to read or write English was more than likely an impediment to his attaining citizenship early on. It may have taken him a decade to learn the language well enough to attain it.

Thanks again, to you both!

Steve
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

James
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 87
Joined: 23 Nov 2015, 06:14
Contact:

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby James » 08 May 2016, 17:38

sacesta wrote:The 1930 Census indicates that Rocco immigrated to the United States in 1930 and that he could neither read or write. The 1940 Census shows that he had only a 2nd grade education!

I think you're correct Erudita. Rocco's inability to read or write English was more than likely an impediment to his attaining citizenship early on. It may have taken him a decade to learn the language well enough to attain it.

Thanks again, to you both!

Steve



Steve, in the case of my ancestors they filed the petition, which I found in the state archives on microfilm, but never went any further! Seems like they just got far to busy on the farm or with their children... Or just didn't think it was important. Lucky for us this has allowed us to pursue citizenship :)
James
http://www.yourfamilybible.com
Professional Genealogy Services

sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 09 May 2016, 13:56

Thanks James. Rocco got his naturalization certificate in 1945. I have a copy of that.

But in column 23 of the 1930 census his status is PA, which indicates that at the time the census was taken, he had already applied for citizenship. That census also shows that Rocco immigrated in 1923.

I received a lot of info about my grandfather from my father and my two aunts, but I have little information about him from the years 1919 when he was discharged from the Italian Cavalry up until 1929 when he was married in Brooklyn. In my opinion, these are the most critical years in Rocco's life because it's when he made the decision to leave Sicily and came to the United States. Unfortunately, I have been unable to find any record of Rocco's immigration.

My question was why did it take Rocco 15+ years to get naturalized and Erudita answered that - his inability to read or write English.

The date of an immigrants intent says something, obviously, about their intentions to remain in the United States. i.e. Did the immigrant decide early on that they wanted to become a US citizen or did they intend to come to the US, earn some cash, and go back to the homeland. I know looking at the census that Rocco made the decision to naturalize within the first seven years of his arrival in New York. I'm trying to narrow it down a bit more. I still need to find him on a passenger list and I need to find his first papers.

I'm beginning to think that he may have come to America as a stowaway.

Because my father was born before Rocco naturalized (thanks in part to Rocco's long naturalization process!) I'm also eligible for Italian citizenship. I haven't decided yet whether I will pursue it.

Thanks again to you all for your input.

Steve
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

James
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 87
Joined: 23 Nov 2015, 06:14
Contact:

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby James » 10 May 2016, 05:06

sacesta wrote:Thanks James. Rocco got his naturalization certificate in 1945. I have a copy of that.

But in column 23 of the 1930 census his status is PA, which indicates that at the time the census was taken, he had already applied for citizenship. That census also shows that Rocco immigrated in 1923.

I received a lot of info about my grandfather from my father and my two aunts, but I have little information about him from the years 1919 when he was discharged from the Italian Cavalry up until 1929 when he was married in Brooklyn. In my opinion, these are the most critical years in Rocco's life because it's when he made the decision to leave Sicily and came to the United States. Unfortunately, I have been unable to find any record of Rocco's immigration.

My question was why did it take Rocco 15+ years to get naturalized and Erudita answered that - his inability to read or write English.

The date of an immigrants intent says something, obviously, about their intentions to remain in the United States. i.e. Did the immigrant decide early on that they wanted to become a US citizen or did they intend to come to the US, earn some cash, and go back to the homeland. I know looking at the census that Rocco made the decision to naturalize within the first seven years of his arrival in New York. I'm trying to narrow it down a bit more. I still need to find him on a passenger list and I need to find his first papers.

I'm beginning to think that he may have come to America as a stowaway.

Because my father was born before Rocco naturalized (thanks in part to Rocco's long naturalization process!) I'm also eligible for Italian citizenship. I haven't decided yet whether I will pursue it.

Thanks again to you all for your input.

Steve


There is so many benefits to obtaining your deserved citizenship and we will help you with anything you need help with along the way!!

Have you looked for first papers at all yet? If so where have you looked?
James
http://www.yourfamilybible.com
Professional Genealogy Services

sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 10 May 2016, 11:05

I've looked online at Family Search and Ancestry Library Edition.
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

James
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 87
Joined: 23 Nov 2015, 06:14
Contact:

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby James » 11 May 2016, 07:45

Not 100% sure this is your Rocco... Because I found another Rocco around the same time period as your with same last name in the same area. BUT... The time on this lines up with the naturalization record you have.

You can order a copy of this record.

Last Name: Acesta
Given Name: Rocco
Birth/Age: -
Volume: -
Record#: 322144
Record Type: Declaration
Date: 1941-Nov-17
Location: USDC-NY-Eastern District

I did another search of that same database with the last name Acesta and his brother did NOT show up... Which I find strange because from my research they did EVERYTHING together. But you never know...

I am attaching the second Rocco I found just for reference.
Attachments
rocco2.jpg
James
http://www.yourfamilybible.com
Professional Genealogy Services

sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 11 May 2016, 12:06

That Rocco may be a cousin. He's 7 years older, born in 1886, I believe.

I was lucky to come across this naturalization certificate while visiting my aunt in Florida last year. Here are the documents I have for Rocco for this general period. I also have his birth and death certificates and church records of baptism and marriage. And I found him in the 1930 and 1940 Census (where his name is misspelled - Rocco Austa in 1930 and Rucco Artale (!) in 1940). I haven't been able to find him in the 1925 NYS Census, on a passenger list or in first papers.

Image

Image

Image

Thanks,

Steve
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

erudita74
Master
Master
Posts: 4843
Joined: 27 Aug 2012, 20:26

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby erudita74 » 11 May 2016, 15:02

Steve
I don't know if any of the following will help.

As to the petition number which appears on the certificate of naturalization you have-I know that the petition # 412743 is in Vol. 1480 in the year 1944. USDC NY Eastern District-name Rocco Acesta

I also found two declarations-one of which could possibly be yours-but you said he had filed for his first papers by the 1930 census and these are later-

one is for a Rocco Acester-record # 272402 July 27, 1938-USDC-NY Eastern District

the other for Rocco Acesta-record #322144 Nov 17, 1941 same as above

http://italiangen.org/records-search/na ... ations.php

If you can get a copy of the petition #412743, I would think it would have a reference number for the declaration of intent.

Erudita

User avatar
Tessa78
Master
Master
Posts: 11580
Joined: 07 Sep 2009, 18:09

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby Tessa78 » 11 May 2016, 15:04

Steve,

You might try ordering reproductions of his naturalization records (first papers - Declaration of Intent, Petition for Naturalization, and Certificate of Arrival) from NARA. You will need to register, then fill out the information from the records you posted above. For a moderate fee (I believe it is about $7.50) they will send you his naturalization packet. Here is the link...

https://eservices.archives.gov/orderonl ... chives.gov

T.

sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 12 May 2016, 00:20

Thanks T. I will do that.
Steve
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

sacesta
Elite
Elite
Posts: 255
Joined: 04 Mar 2016, 21:21
Location: North Carolina via Brooklyn and many places in between

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby sacesta » 12 May 2016, 13:16

Erudita,
Somehow, I missed your post. Thanks for that information. I just placed the order for the records this morning.
NARA's website says that a request for naturalizations records will include the Declaration of Intent, Petition and Naturalization Certificate when each of those records are available. I have the Certificate. Hopefully, they'll find the Declaration and Petition.
Thanks all!
Steve
Steve Acesta

Researching Calatafimi, Trapani
Surnames Aceste, Papa, Cusenza, Gruppuso, Sciortino, Sparacino, Zito, and Vona.

Researching Montevago, Agrigento (Girgenti)
Surnames Infranco, La Rocca, Mandina, Bilello, Cacioppo, and Cardino.

User avatar
Tessa78
Master
Master
Posts: 11580
Joined: 07 Sep 2009, 18:09

Re: First Papers and Naturalization

Postby Tessa78 » 12 May 2016, 22:03

sacesta wrote: I just placed the order for the records this morning.
NARA's website says that a request for naturalizations records will include the Declaration of Intent, Petition and Naturalization Certificate when each of those records are available. I have the Certificate. Hopefully, they'll find the Declaration and Petition.


It should include a Certificate of Arrival!
This was vertification that the applicant arrived legally :-)
Maybe it will solve your mystery?

T.


Return to “Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests