Mother born before 1948, her mom born in Italy

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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RomanS
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Mother born before 1948, her mom born in Italy

Postby RomanS » 17 Apr 2006, 02:47

:?:

I was born in US (1975), my mother born in US (BEFORE 1948, in 1946), and her mother born in Italy in 1913 but did not become naturalized in the US until 1970s. It appears I am not eligible since my mother was born before 1948 (and damn, so close!), but is there any way around this? a court case was mentioned in Italy.. Also my mom's father was born in US, but his father was born in Italy in 1880, came to US in 1888, but can't tell exactly when he was naturalized in US - i found an old census form from 1920 on ancestry.com and it looks as if he was naturalized in 1891, before my mom's dad was born (1912).

any suggestions about how to pull this off?

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mler
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Re: Mother born before 1948, her mom born in Italy

Postby mler » 17 Apr 2006, 07:57

Through your mom's mother, you're right; it won't work. There apparently was a challenge to the 1948 ruling, but it was overturned, and I've not heard of any other case that ignored this, unfortunately, arbitrary date.

It's interesting because I am in almost the same position as your mom in that I was born just before 1948, and my son is about your age. I gave up the idea of citizenship until I discovered that my grandfather was naturalized after my father was born. WHOOPIE.

Now does it work for you? I hope so. My suggestion is that you contact NARA (I believe that stands for National Archives Records Administration). If you live close to one of their offices, go down personally and look up your great grandfather's records. It's all on microfilm and you can get it the same day. But if the office is not nearby, call or write and they will do a search for you (very quickly). Don't rely only on the census because it is only as accurate as the person who wrote in the information. For example, in the 1930 census, it reads that my grandfather was not a citizen, but naturalization records show that he became a citizen in 1928.

I would particularly check because the dates you list don't make sense unless your great great grandfather came to America before his son. There was, I believe, a waiting period of five years before one could become a citizen. Your 11 year old great grandfather could not have naturalized after only living three years in this country unless he came under the "umbrella" of his father's naturalization. The NARA records will tell if that is the case.

If you do not qualify jure sanguinis, you can become a citizen by residing in Italy for three years. Good luck. Let us know how it turns out.

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Re: Mother born before 1948, her mom born in Italy

Postby mler » 17 Apr 2006, 07:59

Oops, I just noticed that you live in NY. The NARA offices are located at 201 Varick Street in lower Manhattan (12th floor). They are super helpful.


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