Looking for a loophole

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
User avatar
Mischa
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: 01 Nov 2006, 00:00

Looking for a loophole

Postby Mischa » 01 Nov 2006, 03:01

I want to apply for dual citizenship through my greatgrandfather, grandmother, Father. the olnly thing is my dad was born in 1940. The consultate said he needed to be born after 1948 for me to qualify. So my question is: is there a loophole to get around this??
Thanks,
Mischa

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 1627
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Looking for a loophole

Postby mler » 01 Nov 2006, 13:01

I wish I could give you better news, but the short answer is "No." Before 1948, women were not permitted to pass on citizenship; thus, even though they may have been Italian, their children were not.

Your grandmother was Italian, but not your father, so there was no citizenship to pass on to you. However, because your grandmother was Italian, you can obtain citizenship by living in Italy (legally) for three years. You would need to state your intention to do so at your consulate and obtain the appropriate visa.

User avatar
Mischa
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: 01 Nov 2006, 00:00

Re: Looking for a loophole

Postby Mischa » 01 Nov 2006, 17:03

Thats ok, but would I give up my US citizenship in the process by pledging aligence to another country?
Thanks,
Mischa

User avatar
wldspirit
Staff
Staff
Posts: 5605
Joined: 17 Nov 2004, 00:00
Location: U.S.A.
Contact:

Re: Looking for a loophole

Postby wldspirit » 01 Nov 2006, 18:21

Try this site:
http://www.expatsinitaly.com/

Covers a wide variety of citizenship laws and shortcuts to obtaining your goal. Run by an expat living in Italy....also has great tips on life in Italy that we here in the states take for granted......
wldspirit

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 1627
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Looking for a loophole

Postby mler » 01 Nov 2006, 18:57

It is considerably easier to have citizenship recognized 'jure sanguinis' than to go through a naturalization process; and some have suggested that naturalizing may make your current citizenship vulnerable. Technically, the U.S. can make an issue over this, but the reality is that it is exceptionally difficult to lose U.S. citizenship (from what I've seen, it's also difficult to obtain it, but that's another issue).

Many people have taken the natualization route (either through residency, marriage, etc.) and I doubt you'll find any who have lost American citizenship as a result. Could it happen? Technically, yes. Is it likely to happen? Definitely no.


Return to “Emigration, Immigration, Naturalization and Italian citizenship”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests