Certificate of Arrival Question

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tlisti
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Name changes

Postby tlisti » 20 Oct 2010, 23:16

Were immigrants to New Orleans given Certificates of Arrival? Would that have contained their correct names, and are there any records of them?

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Re: Name changes

Postby Ginfav » 20 Oct 2010, 23:25

I have information on the Genito and Iacoviello families in Carthage NY. I would like to learn more of Carolina Iacoviello's relatives from Apice Italy. Carolina was born in 1893 and came to the US when she was 16. She married Carlo Genito 7-9-1914. They had 4 children Anthony, James and Mary all deceased. Baby Joseph died at 8 or 9 months old. Carlo had a brother Stanley who settled in Beunoes Aires Argentina.

Carolina's mother was Madeline Tufo. Carolina's father was Carmon Iacoviello or Jacovello. Both spellings could be wrong.

Carlo Genito's mother was Marie and his father was Anthony Genito. Carlo was born 8-21-1890

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Certificates of Arrival

Postby tlisti » 21 Oct 2010, 02:02

Does anyone know if Certificates of Arrival were given out in New Orleans, and if there were records kept of them? Would the information on them have shown their original name, or one that some ship administrator would have written down based on the "sound" of the immigrants italian last name? Thanks!

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Re: Certificates of Arrival

Postby DebiHarbuck » 21 Oct 2010, 02:12

Interesting question. This is what I found...it sounds like the certificates were generated from passenger lists and so the names would be correct.

"Certificates of Arrival were a product of the Basic Naturalization Act of 1906, and begin to appear in court naturalization records ca. 1911. The 1906 law required that each applicant for naturalization be a legally admitted immigrant, and applied to all immigrants arriving after June 29, 1906. These began to apply for citizenship in 1911 (5 years later), and in response to the applications to the courts (Declarations or Petitions), the Immigration Service would issue a Certificate of Arrival, which simply certified information taken from the passenger manifest. The Certificates of Arrival were never given to the immigrant. They were issued and sent to the court, to satisfy the court that the applicant met the admission and residency requirements for naturalization. Certificates of Arrival were associated with Declarations and/or Petitions, but were not the same document. When an immigrant filed a Declaration (or, if they were exempt from the Declaration requirement, when they filed their Petition), one copy of that document went from the court to the US Immigration Service. The INS then checked the immigration records to verify the immigrant's claimed port/date/ship of arrival. When found, they would certify that information on a form called "Certificate of Arrival," and mail it back to the court. Today these forms are often found filed with the court records. Copies of the certificates were not kept by the INS, since they had the passenger list itself. "

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Re: Name changes

Postby nuccia » 21 Oct 2010, 06:56

Found this article that may help answer your question..

Certificate of Arrival -

An excellent article on this subject is contained in the Spring 1996 issue of Avotaynu, entitled "Interpreting U.S. Immigration Manifest Annotations, and authored by Marian L. Smith.

Contrary to common assumption, the Certificate of Arrival was not issued at the time of arrival. It was issued after the Declaration of Intention was filed, confirming that the potential citizen had indeed arrived when he or she stated, and had been in the U.S. more than the minimum years required. It means that a clerk looked at the Declaration of intention, and used that information to find the original passenger manifest. ...read more...

Hope this helps answer your question.
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Re: Certificates of Arrival

Postby nuccia » 21 Oct 2010, 06:57

I have also posted a reply on your other thread. Perhaps we should merge the two threads to avoid duplication of information posted?
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Re: Certificates of Arrival

Postby tlisti » 21 Oct 2010, 14:52

Good Idea...but how does one go about merging the two threads?

And thanks for your help. I enjoyed the additional information Port Arrivals, and it may lead me to additional information about my family's arrival in New Orleans.

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Re: Certificate of Arrival Question

Postby nuccia » 21 Oct 2010, 15:21

Taken care of - the two subjects have now been merged.
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