Living In Italy

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lorene
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Living In Italy

Postby lorene » 19 Jun 2011, 19:21

After reading all I will need to do to pursue citizenship in Italy ( which I plan to continue working on), someone mentioned in a post that I could possibly move there and live for three years.
If I do this, how different is the process? Do I pursue the process over there?
And speaking of being there, where would be suggested areas to live that one could live simply and frugally? I hold a degree in the US as an elementary teacher and would like to live there and study/learn some Italian while there. I have no "Under the Tuscan Sun" dreams. Just feel this deep need to be there; to experience my strong family Italian background culture.
Any advice?
Thanks,
Lorene

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Living In Italy

Postby johnnyonthespot » 19 Jun 2011, 19:47

More importantly than living there for three years, you must do so 100% legally. Frankly, this can be very difficult to pull off.

If you can manage to reside legally in Italy for three years, you can apply for naturalization as an Italian citizen. Normally this would require ten years of residence, but because you have an Italian ancestor "up to the 2nd degree" (a grandparent), you qualify for the three year expedited process. Naturalization is not quite the same thing as having your citizenship recognized jure sanguinis - the primary difference being that it would not automatically grant citizenship to your adult children (or minor children not residing with you) as jure sanguinis recognition would. Citizenship would be granted to any future-born children, however. Basically, in jure sanguinis cases, it is recognized that you are and always were an Italian citizen, whereas in naturalization cases, your Italian citizenship begins on the day your naturalization case is approved.

You should should be able to get details of this process from your local Italian consulate. First off, you would need to apply for a visa and permesso di soggiorno (permit to stay) which would allow you to stay in Italy for at least three years. Work visas are extremely difficult to obtain, so probably out of the question. A study visa would be possible, but normally requires university-level study and for three years that would probably be expensive (note: a study visa permits up to 20 hours of paid work per week). Finally, there is the Elective Residence visa; this is the visa often used by persons who wish to retire in Italy. You must show that you have adequate financial resources to live without an income for the entire period (you will not be permitted to take a job of any kind), that you have health insurance, and a few other details.

Once you have fulfilled the three year requirement, you apply for naturalization, presenting proof that you are descended from an Italian citizen parent or grandparent, and you are well on your way.
Carmine

My hobby is finding things. Having found most of my own, I am happy to help others find theirs. PM me! :)

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lorene
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Re: Living In Italy

Postby lorene » 19 Jun 2011, 20:16

Ok, well I am not old enough yet to retire.( 55). My retirement fund is healthy. How much is considered adequate income? What is retirement age considered to be in Italy? 67 as it is here now? I do not have children to pass anything on to. Nope, education there would be out of the question due to costs.
Health insurance is available if you are a citizen but not if naturalized, correct?
They treated me there for a severe case of food poisoning and would not accept my insurance or any money. Shocked!
How long can I stay (visit) there, without any paperwork?
And lastly, do mind if I ask how you all know so much and why you are so willing to do this for people like me? I can not find ANY words to express my gratitude, and I am not used to such help. Miami can do that do good folks.
Lorene

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Italysearcher
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Re: Living In Italy

Postby Italysearcher » 19 Jun 2011, 21:05

You can stay 3 months as a visitor without a 'permesso di sogiorno'. I believe you can stay longer if you are enrolled in a study course. I know someone who did this but had a difficult time with the courses as they were geared to younger (more mentally active) students and she wanted a real beginner course.
South of Rome is less expensive than the North but the mentality of the people can be a challenge (read my book).
Ann Tatangelo
http://angelresearch.wordpress.com
ANNOYING THE SAINTS - Stories of my Life in Italy. http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-b ... ly/7731505

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lorene
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Re: Living In Italy

Postby lorene » 19 Jun 2011, 21:44

Thanks! I will order and read it.
I am used to a certain mentality of people after teaching elementary school to a a population of immigrants here in Miami and did get a taste of it while traveling south there and Sicily last summer!
I guess your book will include some suggestions on areas/places for an American to live?
Thanks

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Italysearcher
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Re: Living In Italy

Postby Italysearcher » 20 Jun 2011, 10:13

Actually it doesn't contain suggestions on where an American might live. It is a journal covering my first 10 years living inside an Italian family who did not speak any English (except my husband). Depending on your ability to be isolated and happy you might want to choose an area where there are lots of returning emigrants. That is people who emigrated after WW2 and are now returning to retire in Italy. Many will speak English and this might be a lifesaver while you are learning Italian. I couldn't have done it without my husband to explain what was happening even after the fact or to have some conversation above the very basic level in Italian.
It is not easy to make close friends here. Most women in the 55 + age bracket are either working at a job, or babysitting grandchildren while their children work, or are busy in the house and garden. They don't go to museums, or the cinema or window shopping unless they are educated and therefore working full or part-time.
Couples (Under the Tuscan Sun) seem to do better as they have each other to converse with as they learn the language.
I wish you luck, I understand your need to be here and it is a beautiful country full of generous people but without the genealogy research business I have built up over the years I would find it a very lonely existence despite the wonderful and supportive family of my husband, satellite TV where you can watch a movie in English, make cheap phone calls via internet, and have frequent visitors.
Ann
Ann Tatangelo
http://angelresearch.wordpress.com
ANNOYING THE SAINTS - Stories of my Life in Italy. http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-b ... ly/7731505


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