Belleini/Bellini

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Brian in Wedmore
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Belleini/Bellini

Postby Brian in Wedmore » 17 Nov 2011, 21:49

First of all, is the name ever spelt 'Belleini' in Italy, rather than Bellini? My great-great-great-great grandfather, who died in England, was recorded as Alexander Belleini. At the time of his marriage he was illiterate and other spellings sometimes appear for him and other family members but eventually it seems to have settled down as Belleini, although I guess this was just what it sounded like and it could have been something rather different! He was recorded in the 1841 UK census as living in London's 'Little Italy' and was a framemaker, a popular profession for immigrants from northern Italy at the time around Como and the lakes, and is shown as having been born abroad. His marriage was witnessed by people with Italian surnames and was in 1809, before the big Italian immigration. He appears to have been born about 1885. Other Belleinis listed in the 1841 census as living in the same area include Joseph (born abroad 1777), Michael (born abroad in 1781), and Adelaide (born abroad 1786) so it may be that they were siblings and all came to England together and all anglicanized their names, although I think it more lilkely that Adelaide was Joseph's husband. I've little hope of finding out anything more about them, such as where they came from, but does anybody here have any thoughts, ideas or suggesstions, please? Many thanks, Brian Smith

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adelfio
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Re: Belleini/Bellini

Postby adelfio » 18 Nov 2011, 14:54

Welcome to the website Brian
Have you tryed the church of St Andrew Holborn to see if any other records are available for the Belleini family
As far as records from Italy it will be hard because you will have to go through church records for family info because civil records will be not available for that time because Italy was unified between 1860-1870 if your lucky sometimes there are records available from early 1800's for some towns..

Marty
Researching Trabia, Palermo surnames Adelfio, Bondi, Butera, Scardino,Rinella, Scardamaglia

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Tessa78
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Re: Belleini/Bellini

Postby Tessa78 » 18 Nov 2011, 23:01

The name BELLEINI does not wxist in Italy today...

However, you will find BELLEI in the north, and also BELLINI

The spelling BELLEINE sounds more French than Italian... Is this the 1841 Census you mentioned? see below

Name: Alexr Belleine
Event: Census
Event Date: 1841
Gender: Male
Age: 57
Birthplace: Foreign
Record Type: Household
Registration District: St James Clerkenwell
Sub-district: St James Clerkenwell
Civil Parish: St James Clerkenwell
County: Middlesex

T.

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suanj
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Re: Belleini/Bellini

Postby suanj » 20 Nov 2011, 11:21

Hi Brian, by this birth, the surname spelling is Bellini, no doubt:
Name: Mary Ann Bellini
Gender: Female
Baptism/Christening Date: 01 May 1814
Baptism/Christening Place: SAINT ANDREW,HOLBORN,LONDON,ENGLAND
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Death Date:
Name Note:
Race:
Father's Name: Alexander Bellini
Father's Birthplace:
Father's Age:
Mother's Name: Mary
Mother's Birthplace:
Mother's Age:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: P01051-7
System Origin: England-ODM
Source Film Number: 374356
Reference Number:


in this other birth the surname have a different spelling:
Name: Francis Bellieni
Gender: Male
Baptism/Christening Date: 15 Aug 1816
Baptism/Christening Place: SAINT ANDREW,HOLBORN,LONDON,ENGLAND
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Death Date:
Name Note:
Race:
Father's Name: Alexander Bellieni
Father's Birthplace:
Father's Age:
Mother's Name: Mary
Mother's Birthplace:
Mother's Age:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: P01051-7
System Origin: England-ODM
Source Film Number: 374356
Reference Number:

now, because the italian spelling of surname is Bellini, surely, the problem is that Bellini is a very popular surname in Italy... the some italian Bellini in St Andrew Holborn ( 1891 census) seeming born in Morfasso( Piacenza province); the other Bellinis in Uk coming from Genova(Genoa) or Firenze(Florence).. I am positive abt Morfasso as PROBABLE birthplace or however Morfasso area, because the Morfasso framemakers were famous for craftiness...

just a my suggestion,
regards,
suanj
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ITALIAN ORIGIN SEARCH

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Re: Belleini/Bellini

Postby smosh » 24 Apr 2012, 17:14

Hi I have been searching my family tree also Bellini/Bellieni we found a Alexander followed by a Stephen Bellieni then followed by another Stephen Bellieni of 1852 census, we believed this to be my great grandfather of Little Italy also. Is this the same Alexander Bellieni as you have? My Grandfather said his Father Stephen changed his name from Bellini/ie to Bellamy at the first opportunity and we have been trying to locate our Italian roots over the last 5 years, it would be great if we could share findings.

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Re: Belleini/Bellini

Postby davyjUK » 07 May 2012, 16:39

Hi Cousins. Yes you’ve guessed, I’m also head-scratching re GGGGDad Alex together with the origins of the name “BELLEINI” and here’s my offering which might just set you all thinking.
The first record we have is the St Andrew’s Parish Record of the marriage of Alex to Mary Ann in 1809. In this document the spelling attributed to the surname is “BELANIE”.
It is to be remembered that the majority of London’s population at the time, immigrant or otherwise, were illiterate. Therefore when a couple chose to marry they went to church and gave their names orally. The Parish Scribe translated what he heard to the written word.
Fortunately for the current purpose I spent two years working in Italy and spoke the language reasonably well – however whatever fluency I had has been eroded by the past forty years - 12 of which were spent in Spain - during which time my Italian language skills lay dormant, and as we all know – if you don’t use it you lose it.
Based on my research I believe Alex originated from the Lake Como region of Italy and if so in all probability spoke not Italian but Comasco (the Lake Como dialect). Subject to this caveat I have difficulty in accepting that “BELANIE” was a corruption of “Bellini”. Bellini is pronounced and spelt exactly the same in English and Italian, that said I have no knowledge as to how it would have been pronounced by a native Comasco speaker.
To determine Alex’s Italian identity it is appropriate to analyse the word “BELANIE” phonetically. Clearly there are two possible interpretations, bel-AYN-ni represented by the English name “Bellany” alternatively “bell-AHN-ni” and translating this phonetic interpretation to Italian - “BELLANI”.
The 1841 census confirms Alex was born “In foreign parts” had he been a Bellany, of English speaking stock, I doubt he would have lost his identity and the name would have carried, without corruption, down the generations initially to the couple’s offspring.
Alex’s Italian identity is confirmed by a number of clues. His trade/occupation in the christening records of his children is given as a Framemaker and a Picture Framemaker (although in later life he gave up this trade and became a wire worker – the same occupation as his eldest son Stephen).
Alex arrived in England in the early 1800’s some fifty years before the huge tide of Italian emigration of the late 18 early 1900’s. Lucio Sponza in his book “Italian immigrants in 19th Century Britain: Reality and Images” accounts for only 2,000 immigrants of Italian origin living in London in 1820 to 1851. Of the skilled artisans leaving Italy to seek their fortune elsewhere at the time were makers of optical instruments, silversmiths, makers of frames, bird-cages and fine wood workers.
Leather Lane was the centre of London’s Italian community from the 1700’s. In the 1871 Census Stephen, Alex’s eldest surviving son, gives his place of birth as “Leather Lane”. The location is spitting distance from St Andrew’s Church and it therefore is reasonable to assume that Alex and Mary Ann lived here following their marriage. The Lane was the centre of barometer manufacture in the early 1800’s a magnet for highly skilled Italian artisans many of whom originated from the area around Lake Como in Northern Italy.
The website “l’origine dei cognomi italiani” (the origins of Italian surnames) confirms the name “Bellani” to be a surname originating in the centre north of Italy – an area which would include Lake Como.
Alex was illiterate and remained so for his entire life – he appears as a witness on the 1840 marriage record of youngest son Henry to Penelope Rackham signing with his “mark”. His influence on the evolution of the surname was limited to oral transmission this being evidenced by the Baptismal records of the couple’s offspring.
Stephen (1812) - Bellamy
Mary Ann (1814) – Bellini
Francis (1816) – Bellieni
Henry (1822) - Belliene
Stephen’s marriage record to Elizabeth Parlour witnessed by his sister Mary Ann confirms Alex’s children received an education and were literate – both signed the Parish Register. At present this document provides the first recorded use of the name “BELLEINI” both Mary’s and Stephen’s signatures being clearly decipherable and ending in an “i”. However, by the time of the 1841 Census Stephen’s surname reverts to “BELLEINE”.
By the time of the 1841 Census Alex was living alone in Woods Place a street adjoining Bowling Green Lane where Stephen lived. The latest baptismal record (1822) for youngest son Henry records Alex’s occupation as a Picture Frame Maker however the Census lists the occupation of both father and eldest son Stephen as “Wire Workers”.
One final element of the jigsaw worthy of mention is that it was traditional in many Italian families at the time to name the first born son after the father and the first born daughter after the mother. Subsequent children were often named after the grand-parents. This tradition is evident in Stephen’s and Henry’s lines (not too much data is currently available for Mary Ann and Francis).
Alex and Mary Ann married in November 1809 however their first recorded child Stephen was not baptised until September 1812. Acknowledging there was often a gap of several years between birth and baptism it is possible that there could have been an earlier male child who died in infancy. This being the case the child would have been given the father’s name and the second born – Stephen - the grandfather’s. A further clue of conformity to the tradition lies in the fact that the couple’s first girl child was given her mother’s name Mary Ann.
As to the corruption from “BELLANI” to “BELLEINI” this could have its explanation in the corruption of the letter “a”. 19th century script provides a tantalising clue. There are many instances of a’s being formed by the stroke coming over the top of the letter looping on its return to form the body of the letter and rising to meet the loop to complete the letter. If by chance the letter was not fully completed this could well have been deciphered as an “ei” instead of an “a”– were this the case the name “BELLEINI” would have been born.
Following on the above we are possibly looking for a twenty something skilled wood worker by the name of Alessandro Bellani born about 1784 in the Duchy of Milan and son of Stefano who having learnt the art of frame making and wood carving left his homeland and walked to England in search of a better future – Would I like to know more? Of course. Will I continue looking? Absolutely.


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