birth records in early 1800s

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elmosgirl
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birth records in early 1800s

Postby elmosgirl » 16 May 2016, 19:35

To Board members:

Some of the birth records I have are quite specific in noting the relationship of the parents,
where the scribe has recorded:
sua legittimo moglie
for the child's mother.

Other records merely note :
moglie
for the woman.

Some of my found records only name the woman, without any other notation. Assumptions,
though dangerous, can be made about these.

But, what do these differences mean, if anything, relative to research purposes?

And if they aren't merely reflections of the attention and carefulness given record-taking,
or lack of same, what do they signify culturally/socially/etc.for the time period?

Thanks!
Noel

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Re: birth records in early 1800s

Postby Alvigini-Astrologi » 17 May 2016, 03:31

Sorlino

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Re: birth records in early 1800s

Postby Alvigini-Astrologi » 17 May 2016, 03:33

Alvigini

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Re: birth records in early 1800s

Postby Italysearcher » 17 May 2016, 11:44

On a civil birth record if both parents are named then they are married. Period. If they weren't married then the child would have a record with only one parents name OR an invented surname. That was the law. Children born to unmarried women were traditionally removed from the mother and sent to the local Brefotrofio. If she married later she could claim the child. This was to protect her from the eveidence of her sin.
Civil record keeping began in 1809 where Napoleon was in power. Prior to that the church kept track of births, marriages and deaths. In 1815 when Napoloen was defeated, civil records continued in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies but not in the Vatican States. North Italy has it's own variances depending on who was in power.
Ann Tatangelo
http://angelresearch.wordpress.com
ANNOYING THE SAINTS - Stories of my Life in Italy. http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-b ... ly/7731505

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elmosgirl
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Re: birth records in early 1800s

Postby elmosgirl » 17 May 2016, 14:12

Thanks,Ann,
Wonderful answer that "fits" with my reading and thoughts.
But so good to have additional confirmation from another researcher.
I appreciate your time,
Noel


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