d'stato libero

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Pontiusmaximus
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d'stato libero

Postby Pontiusmaximus » 11 Aug 2016, 17:35

A civil marriage record that states both the man and woman are 'd'stato libero'. Am I assuming correctly that this in not their first marriage and that neither are widowed but maybe divorced or somehow otherwise free to marry? Or does this have some other meaning. And would this also explain the possible or likely fact that I could find no record of a church marriage?

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adelfio
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Re: d'stato libero

Postby adelfio » 11 Aug 2016, 17:49

Can you post the record so we can see the wording?

Marty
Researching Trabia, Palermo surnames Adelfio, Bondi, Butera, Scardino,Rinella, Scardamaglia

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Pontiusmaximus
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Re: d'stato libero

Postby Pontiusmaximus » 11 Aug 2016, 17:59

I haven't quite got the knack of all the features here yet, but here's the link to the page on Familysearch.org
left side of page, wording is next to bride and groom's names

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/T ... cc=2051639 :

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adelfio
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Re: d'stato libero

Postby adelfio » 11 Aug 2016, 18:35

It means they were married in the church earlier 1872

PG LINK LEFT SIDE
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1 ... cc=2046915

Marty
Researching Trabia, Palermo surnames Adelfio, Bondi, Butera, Scardino,Rinella, Scardamaglia

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Re: d'stato libero

Postby Pontiusmaximus » 11 Aug 2016, 20:16

Thanks to much. I would have never imagined that to be the meaning.

erudita74
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Re: d'stato libero

Postby erudita74 » 13 Aug 2016, 23:04

Stato libero

In the civil marriage records of this town, at least for this year, Marty seems to be correct that the phrase “stato libero,” which translates to “free state,” indicates that the individuals now marrying in the civil ceremony previously had had a church marriage. The reason why I believe this is true is because I also see that, in this section of marriage records, the term was applied to spouses whose civil marriage was now legalizing the births of their children born from their natural union, which is how the civil records (post the unification of Italy) dealt with children born after a church marriage, but before a civil one. The civil state did not recognize church marriages, and vice versa, so in the eyes of the civil state, the fact that a couple had previously married in a religious ceremony did not mean they were married in the eyes of the civil law. So, hence, they were of “free state,” or free to marry in a civil union. They were not bigamists. At least, this is my understanding of the situation.
Quite frankly though, in my twenty or so years of doing this kind of research, I have not previously seen the phrase “stato libero” following the name of the groom or bride in the post unification civil records, for a couple who had previously married in the church. I also know that there is a document called a “certificate di stato libero ecclesiastico” which was issued by a parish certifying that the individual was not previously married, according to the religious rite, especially if the person had lived outside of the diocese for a period of at least a year. This certificate was not issued, however, if the couple had previously been married in the church, or according to the rite of the Catholic Church.
In the pre unification period, we often find among the marriage allegati or processetti, a document called “certifcato dello stato libero dello sposo.” This document was issued for the prospective groom to indicate that he was free to marry, i.e., that he wasn’t a member of the clergy, did not have military obligations, and was not already married to someone else.
Today in Italy, there is a “certificate di stato libero” which is issued by the anagrafe or registry offices of the various towns where the prospective spouses reside. The document indicates the individual’s “free state” to marry (whether single-celibe o nubile-never before married), widowed, or divorced. Note that divorce was not legalized in Italy until December of 1970 or early 1971, although a marriage could be annulled, for example, if the groom was found to be impotent (civil code of 1865). I also know that currently, foreign citizens residing in Italy have to produce a “certificate of their free state,” in order to marry there.


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