Title of "Maestro"

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Title of "Maestro"

Postby Storia » 28 Jan 2010, 14:29

I have been looking at several records (microfilms from Family History Library) for an ancestor in Sicily in the 19th Cenury. At various times in his life he is referred to using his profession and one time he is called "Maestro":
For example -
1832: on the birth record of his son, he is stated to have been:
"contadino" (farm worker)

1869: on his death record, reported by his son, he is stated to have been:
"agricoltoro" (farmer, farm work).. OK that's consistent.

but in 1857: on the marriage record of his son he is stated to have been:
"bracciante" (hired help) and when his name is stated he is referred to as:
"Maesto _____".

Kindly tell me the significance of the use of this title. Is this a form of respect or does it signify some level of expertise or craftsmanship??

Grazie!
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby johnnyonthespot » 28 Jan 2010, 14:37

Storia wrote:... At various times in his life he is referred to using his profession and one time he is called "Maestro":
...
but in 1857: on the marriage record of his son he is stated to have been:
"bracciante" (hired help) and when his name is stated he is referred to as:
"Maesto _____".


Maestro or Maesto?

"Maestro" can be thought of as teacher or leader. http://www.wordreference.com cites the following examples:

colpo da maestro - masterstroke
maestro d'asilo - kindergarten teacher
maestro di canto - singing teacher
maestro di cerimonie - master of ceremonies
maestro di piano - piano teacher
maestro di sci - ski instructor


Perhaps at that point in his farm career he was teaching other workers?
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby suanj » 28 Jan 2010, 15:12

especially: craftsmanship ... top level.... sometimes is used "maestro" and sometimes "mastro"
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby liviomoreno » 28 Jan 2010, 16:07

johnnyonthespot wrote:http://www.wordreference.com cites the following examples:

colpo da maestro - kindergarten teacher
maestro di canto - singing teacher
maestro di cerimonie - master of ceremonies
maestro di piano - piano teacher
maestro di sci - ski instructor





colpo da maestro - masterstroke.
maestro d'asilo - kindergarten teacher.
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby johnnyonthespot » 28 Jan 2010, 16:12

liviomoreno wrote:
johnnyonthespot wrote:http://www.wordreference.com cites the following examples:

colpo da maestro - kindergarten teacher
maestro di canto - singing teacher
maestro di cerimonie - master of ceremonies
maestro di piano - piano teacher
maestro di sci - ski instructor





colpo da maestro - masterstroke.
maestro d'asilo - kindergarten teacher.


Oops! I messed up when pasting. It is fixed now.

Grazie mille!
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby PeterTimber » 28 Jan 2010, 16:15

Maesto is most likely a writing error since Maesto means majestic, however I agree with everybody that the term applied to an agricultural worker would signify that his abilities warranted the title of respect. =Peter=
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby liviomoreno » 28 Jan 2010, 16:32

PeterTimber wrote:Maesto is most likely a writing error since Maesto means majestic, however I agree with everybody that the term applied to an agricultural worker would signify that his abilities warranted the title of respect. =Peter=


The word Maesto does not exist in Italian...
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby PeterTimber » 28 Jan 2010, 16:41

Dear Livio I agree with you as I can see you are correct ,however, I was referring to the mispelling of the word MAESTO for the purpose of Maestro and not to be confused with MAESTA. =Peter=
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby Storia » 01 Feb 2010, 12:41

Hello everyone who answered my original post, and thank you!

I am sorry, the "Maesto" was a typing error.

the title that interested me is "Maestro." and I will interpret it as a title of respect, and perhaps some level of skill.
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby suanj » 01 Feb 2010, 13:45

Storia: I already replied abt Maestro... not worry.. I understood equally... because "maesto" exist not
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Re: Title of "Maestro"

Postby carinthiangirl » 20 Mar 2010, 20:45

maestro = master, also teacher
maestoso = majestic
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