Hospital in Via Laterano, Rome in 1890s?

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Hospital in Via Laterano, Rome in 1890s?

Postby MaryLF » 27 Mar 2013, 00:38

Please help. I'm looking for information that might give me more information about abandoned babies in Italy during the late 1800s.

The persistent efforts of Ann Tatangelo from Angel Research (http://angelresearch.wordpress.com) for the last year confirmed that my maternal GM was at the Brefotrofio of Rome from 1893 - 1895. Ann was also able to confirm from the records at Santo Spirito my GM's date of birth March 4, 1893, and that she was 2 years old when she left Santo Spirito to presumably go to Pico,FR where she was raised by a Carnevale family.

With Luisa's date of birth confirmed, Ann was able to request Luisa's birth record from Rome. Here is a summary of Luisa's birth record:

“...a hospital in Via Laterano...from a woman who does not consent to be named...born a baby of the female sex which was presented to me and to whom was given the name of Luisa and the surname of Liaci...The said baby girl is ordered to be taken to the Brefotrofio of Rome by the declarant above stated together with a copy of this act together with the baby and to be given to the Director of this place...”

I have so may questions that will never be answered, but I'm hoping that someone in this community might help me answer these questions:

1. Does anyone know the name of the hospital (from 1893) near San Giovanni Laterano that is referenced and have any information about it?
2. In 1893, who were the women that gave birth in hospitals in Italy? I read that during the 19th century, the women who gave birth in hospitals were poor (could not afford a midwife, etc.).
3. Based on the social values of the time, is it fair to assume that my GM's birth mother did not consent to be named because she was unmarried?
4. My GM was given the surname Liaci at City Hall...that last name was probably chosen at random, correct?

Thank you!
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Re: Hospital in Via Laterano, Rome in 1890s?

Postby PippoM » 27 Mar 2013, 10:18

1) An important hospital named "San Giovanni" still exists in Roma near the Basilica
2) I think that was the time when in cities women started giving birth in hospitals, while in villages they went on doing that at home, because of absence of fast means of transport to places with hospitals
3) Yes, of course
4) Yes, it is possible. The Registrar himself chose surnames at random or following some "strange" rule of his own.
Giuseppe "Pippo" Moccaldi

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Re: Hospital in Via Laterano, Rome in 1890s?

Postby MaryLF » 28 Mar 2013, 00:12

Hi Pippo,

Thank you for your reply! :D

Today I found references & photos of the Ospedale delle Donne al Laterano which sounds like it functioned as the maternity department of the Ospedale del Salvatore located nearby. Unfortunately, I have not yet found any historical/sociological information about the Women's Hospital; but, I did find a reference that Maria Montessori was studying pediatrics & women's health issues at San Giovanni Lanterano in the late 1890s. 

I am thinking that the Ospedale delle Donne al Laterano was probably the maternity hospital where my GM was born. I will keep looking for information about the women who went there to give birth during the late 19th century.
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