Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

As a nation state, Italy has emerged only in 1871. Until then the country was politically divided into a large number of independant cities, provinces and islands. The currently available evidences point out to a dominant Etruscan, Greek and Roman cultural influence on today's Italians.
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Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby GlobeTrotter » 15 Oct 2005, 04:04

Hello everyone,

I am a college student and I'm pursuing a degree in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Thanks to the help of members on this board, I've discovered that I am a potential dual citizen of Italy (I'm currently gathering documents for application). I have been thinking about teaching in Italy after I get my degree in English as well as the dual citizenship. I know this isn't as easy as it sounds, though. I was wondering if somebody can help me with a couple of questions that I have, because I'm not sure if my goal of being an English teacher in Italy is very realistic. I have been doing some research on this topic but couldn't find much information. Maybe somebody can point me to a website or other helpful resource. Some questions I have are...is English taught in most schools in Italy? Is there much availablity to teach it? What is the average salary of a teacher? What are the living costs in Italy?
I know that these are a lot of questions, but I would really appreciate any help. Thank you!

Mark
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby Marco » 15 Oct 2005, 04:58

GlobeTrotter wrote:Some questions I have are...is English taught in most schools in Italy? Is there much availablity to teach it? What is the average salary of a teacher? What are the living costs in Italy?
I know that these are a lot of questions, but I would really appreciate any help. Thank you!
Mark

Hi Mark,
English today is taught in every school in Italy, I believe also in grammar schools. To become a teacher in a state school (what we call public schools) is rather a complicate thing and I don't believe you could find vacancies there. Teaching as a private (freelance) teacher or in private schools might be easier, especially since you are an English mother tongue, but I really have no idea of the availability and I don't know how much does a teacher make, though I'm afraid you're not going to be rich. Living costs are incredibly different from town to town. According to the newspapers Milan is among the most expensive cities in the galaxy (together with Tokio and others ..) and they seem to be proud of that 8O
I believe Milan and Rome have the best opportunities for private teaching.
If I find some other info I'll let you know.
best wishes
Marco
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby GlobeTrotter » 15 Oct 2005, 05:14

Thank you for the reply, Marco. I'm just curious, but why is it so difficult to find a job teaching in a public "state" school? Are there really high expectations or requirements? What about at universities?
Thanks again,

Mark
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby Marco » 15 Oct 2005, 14:11

GlobeTrotter wrote:Thank you for the reply, Marco. I'm just curious, but why is it so difficult to find a job teaching in a public "state" school? Are there really high expectations or requirements? What about at universities?
Thanks again,

Mark

The problem is that to find a job in the state schools you have to "register" at the beginning of the school year (September) in a sort of "waiting list" which is, I believe, province-oriented. The first places in the list will have one-year jobs, the rest will have to wait until a teacher is ill or in any case absent for more than some days and get a, say, 10 days job (and maybe 50 miles from where you live). To be in the top of the list you must have "points" which depends on how many days you worked the previous years etc. Sometimes there are global state exams ("Concorsi") and if you pass them you get more points; consider that in Italy today the birth rate is very low, so that there are less students and too many teachers. Teaching in the university is more difficult as there are by far less vacancies and I don't think you can get temporary "replacement" jobs.
In private schools there is no bureaucracy and you can get a job in the "normal" way (after an interview I mean). I think that today there is work in the special schools that teach English to professionals (managers, politicians etc).
I know rules keep on changing so I hope my information is correct, I'm not a teacher and my school days are lost in the mists of time :)
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby wldspirit » 15 Oct 2005, 19:30

A general idea of cost of living is found at the following site,
also at the bottom of the page is a pdf file for cost of living in
the Marche, keeping in mind that one area will differ from another.
http://www.expatsinitaly.com/living/col.htm
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby italy50 » 15 Oct 2005, 20:52

Teaching English in Italy is a "real" possibility, but more so in a private school. In the larger cities Roma, Milano, etc, there are many teachers and English is generally taught. However, in many of the small rural villages, English is not taught to Elementary school children, as there are no teachers to fill this vacancy. What Marco says is basicly true throughout Italy. As a dual citizen, however, it is possible to open your own private school, especially in the smaller towns, which are more remote. As for cost of living, the larger towns like Milano, Venezia, and Roma, cater to tourism and so charge more for apartments, while the remote areas are much cheaper.

Greater success at teaching in Italy is achieved more so by those with degrees, and possibly those who are recommended or invited to come to Italy, by an accredited university in the US. Those with "lesser" credentials may have greater success at private schools, rather than Universities or State schools. However, it is still possible to teach in state schools, but there may be a waiting list
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby GlobeTrotter » 16 Oct 2005, 03:00

Thank you all for the helpful advice. I just have a couple more questions... :wink:

On my consulate's website, it says that applicants for dual citizenship need to mention the Commune in Italy where they intend to establish residence. Does this have to be the Commune of the ancestors, or could it be any "randomly selected" commune? If you register at a commune, are you guaranteed to be accepted?
Just as an example, let's say that I established a residence in a commune in Sicily, but then a couple years later decided to move to Calabria. Is there much flexibily in this kind of residential movement between different provinces?

Thank you again the help! :D

Mark
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby italy50 » 16 Oct 2005, 03:37

The Consulate wants to know where you want your 'file' sent. The consulate is only concerned that they have a comune where the records will be sent in Italy. They do not care where you live. You do not have to live in the town of your ancestors, nor in the town where your records are kept.

It is a good idea to have the records sent to your ancestors comune, but not necessary.
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby Freethinker » 01 Sep 2010, 16:59

italy50 wrote:Teaching English in Italy is a "real" possibility, but more so in a private school. In the larger cities Roma, Milano, etc, there are many teachers and English is generally taught. However, in many of the small rural villages, English is not taught to Elementary school children, as there are no teachers to fill this vacancy. What Marco says is basicly true throughout Italy. As a dual citizen, however, it is possible to open your own private school, especially in the smaller towns, which are more remote. As for cost of living, the larger towns like Milano, Venezia, and Roma, cater to tourism and so charge more for apartments, while the remote areas are much cheaper.


ooOOO, that would be so awesome.....i have a new shiny passport, i would love to live in a small rural village and teach children English! I would do it for room and board! Ah....nice dream.
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby PeterTimber » 03 Sep 2010, 14:37

dentists, pharmacists, medical doctors and hospitals and Ambulance services???? distances to each. distances to bus and train Are other things to consider......among others? =Peter=
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby misbris » 03 Sep 2010, 15:14

Another possibility might be as a teacher on an American military base in Italy. I don't know what current policy or need is but you can check DOD website.
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby PeterTimber » 03 Sep 2010, 15:45

and you can teach army brats and buy stuff at the Commisary!!!=Peter=
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby misbris » 03 Sep 2010, 16:01

And live in subsidized housing with an Aamerican salary in a foreign country. 8) :wink:
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby PeterTimber » 03 Sep 2010, 16:12

....don't forget the job and the pension if you don't meet Mr Right? =Peter=
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Re: Teaching English in Italy - realistic?

Postby misbris » 03 Sep 2010, 16:14

I may apply myself!!!!
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