Help with Italian Translation

Having problems with the Italian language? Do you need help to translate or understand an old family document? There is always someone who can help you!
24 posts • Page 2 of 21, 2

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby elba » 07 Sep 2009, 16:26

Maybe what was 'heard' by Peter was something like:

"Ma tieniti duro..." or "Ma tenerti duro..." using the verb TENERE = 'tenere su il morale'. To bolster someone's morale;

and not MANTENERE = to keep, to maintain, to preserve.

Just an idea....
elba
If you think education is expensive - try ignorance!
"Gente di Mare Genealogy"
User avatar
elba
V.I.P.
V.I.P.
 
Posts: 739
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 01:00
Location: The Alps - N.Italy

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby pink67 » 07 Sep 2009, 16:28

Pink67 wrote:Peter,

I totally agree with Luca... I've never heard in my life "mantieniti forte"...

Laura

p.s. maybe it was "tieni duro"? (very confidential)


Yes Elba :D I think so....
User avatar
pink67
Master
Master
 
Posts: 4447
Joined: 25 Oct 2005, 00:00
Location: italia - liguria

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby PeterTimber » 07 Sep 2009, 16:47

Thanks guys for your kindness but here I must part. I know what I heard and what I used when they and I in turn, said "Mantieni Forte". Be that as it may Let us put this to rest. I went thru 95 pages(yes 95 pages) of idiomatic expressions and there is NO expression Mantieni Forte so it may have been a peculiarity started by someone who created the expression and passed it onto others , came into existence and passed away like a fashionable saying that comes and goes. Thank you all. =Peter=
~Peter~
User avatar
PeterTimber
Master
Master
 
Posts: 6640
Joined: 16 Dec 2007, 19:57
Location: Yonkers NY

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby cowgirlup » 08 Sep 2009, 00:24

So what's the difference between sia forte and stare forte? it looks like a couple different people here are saying they both mean stay strong... what about soggiorno..(it means stay, right) which would be in the best context for the word stay?
:)
User avatar
cowgirlup
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 5
Joined: 04 Sep 2009, 03:02

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby elba » 08 Sep 2009, 07:28

cowgirlup wrote:So what's the difference between sia forte and stare forte? it looks like a couple different people here are saying they both mean stay strong... what about soggiorno..(it means stay, right) which would be in the best context for the word stay?
:)


Well I see it this way:
'sia forte' = (you) be strong

'stare forte' = (you) stay strong.

Soggiorno is used when you are physically 'staying' in a place.

Good example is the (in)famous Permesso di Soggiorno which gives you permission to stay in Italy for a certain period of time...

Hope that helps
elba
If you think education is expensive - try ignorance!
"Gente di Mare Genealogy"
User avatar
elba
V.I.P.
V.I.P.
 
Posts: 739
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 01:00
Location: The Alps - N.Italy

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby Lucap » 08 Sep 2009, 08:16

I hope Elba will translate for you :wink:

La principale differenza tra "sia forte" e "stai forte" è che il primo è alla terza persona singolare dell'imperativo (e si usa quando si dà del "lei" a qualcuno, ma è un concetto difficile, forse, da capire per gli inglesi in quanto nei paesi anglofoni si usa sempre e soltanto il "tu"), mentre il secondo è all'infinito (e, chiaramente, non si usa nel colloquio diretto). Quindi, come già detto sopra, parlando o scrivendo a qualcuno che si conosce bene io direi "sii forte" e non sia forte (anche se è un linguaggio un po' forbito e, nella realtà, si userebbero espressioni più dirette come: fatti coraggio - fatti forza - o altro ancora).
Inoltre per indicare la forza d'animo si usa il verbo essere (essere forti, quindi) e non il verbo stare. Stare forti si usa, ad esempio, nel linguaggio colloquiale per dire stare bene economicamente o quando si gioca a carte e si hanno delle ottime opportunità di vincita.
Spero di aver chiarito di cowgirl.

L.
User avatar
Lucap
Master
Master
 
Posts: 741
Joined: 16 Feb 2008, 17:27
Location: Terni - Italy

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby elba » 08 Sep 2009, 13:20

Lucap wrote:I hope Elba will translate for you :wink:

La principale differenza tra "sia forte" e "stai forte" è che il primo è alla terza persona singolare dell'imperativo (e si usa quando si dà del "lei" a qualcuno, ma è un concetto difficile, forse, da capire per gli inglesi in quanto nei paesi anglofoni si usa sempre e soltanto il "tu"), mentre il secondo è all'infinito (e, chiaramente, non si usa nel colloquio diretto). Quindi, come già detto sopra, parlando o scrivendo a qualcuno che si conosce bene io direi "sii forte" e non sia forte (anche se è un linguaggio un po' forbito e, nella realtà, si userebbero espressioni più dirette come: fatti coraggio - fatti forza - o altro ancora).
Inoltre per indicare la forza d'animo si usa il verbo essere (essere forti, quindi) e non il verbo stare. Stare forti si usa, ad esempio, nel linguaggio colloquiale per dire stare bene economicamente o quando si gioca a carte e si hanno delle ottime opportunità di vincita.
Spero di aver chiarito di cowgirl.

L.


[color=indigo]
Translation:
The principle difference between "sia forte" and "stai forte" is that the first is the third person singular of the imperative (and you use it when you give the “leiâ€
If you think education is expensive - try ignorance!
"Gente di Mare Genealogy"
User avatar
elba
V.I.P.
V.I.P.
 
Posts: 739
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 01:00
Location: The Alps - N.Italy

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby Lucap » 08 Sep 2009, 13:42

Lucap wrote:Spero di aver chiarito di cowgirl.


8O Sorry, i did intend to write:
Spero di aver chiarito i dubbi di cowgirl.

Thank you Elba for the translation :wink:

L.
User avatar
Lucap
Master
Master
 
Posts: 741
Joined: 16 Feb 2008, 17:27
Location: Terni - Italy

Re: Help with Italian Translation

Postby cowgirlup » 08 Sep 2009, 18:09

Thank you, thank you, thank you, Lucap and Elba for helping me!!! :D
User avatar
cowgirlup
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 5
Joined: 04 Sep 2009, 03:02

Previous

24 posts • Page 2 of 21, 2

Return to Italian language, handwriting , script & translations

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests

Copyright © 2014. www.ItalianGenealogy.com.