Latin and Italian

Having problems with the Italian language? Do you need help to translate or understand an old family document? There is always someone who can help you!
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DeFilippis78
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Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 01:46

Im interested in learning not only Italian but also Latin. Is Latin and Italian close enough where if you understand one you can understand the other?

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Squigy
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby Squigy » 08 Nov 2010, 01:51

DeFilippis78 wrote:Im interested in learning not only Italian but also Latin. Is Latin and Italian close enough where if you understand one you can understand the other?


Italian is very close to Latin, but not close enough to understand both by learning one. Certainly learning Latin can help when learning Italian, no doubt about that.
My Italian surnames:

Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone

Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile

Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 01:54

Thats what I figured because Im seeing the same concept when learning Spanish. Just thought I would check though :)

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Squigy
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby Squigy » 08 Nov 2010, 01:58

Here's something I saw about the ease of learning Latin:

http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/lati ... inEasy.htm
My Italian surnames:



Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone



Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile



Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 02:07

Ive tried Latin in the past and it is a tough one. My main interest though is ecclesiastical Latin because I would like to incorporate more into prayer and Mass. I prefer Latin Mass and prayer in Latin but want a better understanding of it in general. I have a lot of antique books filled with Latin in regards to Catholicism and I would love to be able to understand it all. I have been told that ecclesiastical is somewhat different than basic latin but I dont see how

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Squigy
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby Squigy » 08 Nov 2010, 02:12

DeFilippis78 wrote:Ive tried Latin in the past and it is a tough one. My main interest though is ecclesiastical Latin because I would like to incorporate more into prayer and Mass. I prefer Latin Mass and prayer in Latin but want a better understanding of it in general. I have a lot of antique books filled with Latin in regards to Catholicism and I would love to be able to understand it all. I have been told that ecclesiastical is somewhat different than basic latin but I dont see how


I thought that was why. Latin is the language of the church, so I think it's great for Catholics to learn it. Good luck.
My Italian surnames:



Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone



Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile



Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 02:16

I love the concept of a universal language within the church. I can walk up to any priest in any country and he would actually be able to understand me if I knew Latin. I love that!

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Squigy
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby Squigy » 08 Nov 2010, 02:19

DeFilippis78 wrote:I love the concept of a universal language within the church. I can walk up to any priest in any country and he would actually be able to understand me if I knew Latin. I love that!


I agree, that's the way it should be.
My Italian surnames:



Caserta: Maietta, Rossano, Tessitore, Negro, Peluso, Musone



Campobasso: D'Andrea, Barile



Catanzaro: Fiorelli/Fiorillo, Romito

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 02:25

Amen to that Squigy :)

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timo
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby timo » 08 Nov 2010, 11:36

The language of the Church was Greek before it was Latin, and Aramaic before it was Greek. But the true language of the Church is the tongue of fire.

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 15:26

The greek and aramaic are true, but the Latin was adopted by the Church and used ever since for centuries. Even though today they use the vernacular they still have to copy all notes, records, and documents in Latin.

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Cherry
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby Cherry » 08 Nov 2010, 15:38

Good luck to you.

How many tears over that damned Cicero? Or those really unbearable - too boring- first christians?...

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 15:42

I cant say I find anything boring in the Church. Im a Third Order Dominican. Its an 800 year old order stemming from St Dominic and we study, teach and preach the history and truth of the Church. So to me, I love it all :)

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Cherry
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby Cherry » 08 Nov 2010, 16:03

I see your point of view.
I just can say that when you are 17, after kindergarden with Nuns and 8 years of preparation for the Sacraments, those scripts -second to fift century- sound quite boring because you know them quite by heart.
Anyway, I loved Sant'Agostino and I agree with you that history of the Church is more than interesting.
Olive branch? :-)

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DeFilippis78
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Re: Latin and Italian

Postby DeFilippis78 » 08 Nov 2010, 16:05

Cherry wrote:I see your point of view.
I just can say that when you are 17, after kindergarden with Nuns and 8 years of preparation for the Sacraments, those scripts -second to fift century- sound quite boring because you know them quite by heart.
Anyway, I loved Sant'Agostino and I agree with you that history of the Church is more than interesting.
Olive branch? :-)


LOL! Yes, I can see to a teenager it would be quite a drag and making you yawn a lot :)


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