why would J show up in the name of a town?

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sceaminmonkey
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why would J show up in the name of a town?

Postby sceaminmonkey » 07 Mar 2011, 06:46

so I am taking italian and am told there is no J in the alphabet. However I see that the name of the comune di Lajatico does have a J. I remember hearing somethign about how dialects can use different writing systems etc but I want to be more clear on it and I am super curious. I know it is also accepted for foreign words but this place is in italy!! actually andrea bocelli so whats up with the J? whats the deal with a standard italian alphabet?

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Italysearcher
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Re: why would J show up in the name of a town?

Postby Italysearcher » 07 Mar 2011, 09:07

I believe it is called an elongated i. It is also seen in surnames.
Ann Tatangelo
http://angelresearch.wordpress.com
ANNOYING THE SAINTS - Stories of my Life in Italy. http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-b ... ly/7731505

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Tessa78
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Re: why would J show up in the name of a town?

Postby Tessa78 » 07 Mar 2011, 15:25

Further information on the letter "j" and "i"

From this site - page 5
http://familyhistory.byu.edu/Downloads/ ... tion_A.pdf

The letters J, K, W, X, and Y appear in the Italian alphabet, but are used mainly in
foreign words adopted into the Italian vocabulary. Examples: jazz, kilogramme, waterpolo,
xilofono, yacht. The letter j, as used in older texts, had an "i" sound and was
often used in place of a double i.


T.

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JohnArmellino
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Re: why would J show up in the name of a town?

Postby JohnArmellino » 07 Mar 2011, 17:30

While the modern Italian alphabet has no letter j as used in native terms [the letter j does appear in dictionaries for archaic spellings and foreign and international terms officially adopted in Italian], years ago the letter long i [i lungo] was used in triphthongs or when the letter i was combined with other vowels to form one sound, e.g., proietto/projetto or gioiello/giojello or Boiano/Bojano. This sound is similar to the y in yellow or lawyer. The long i was sometimes used to denote this sound.
John Armellino


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