Atti di Morte translation

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leryan
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Atti di Morte translation

Postby leryan » 13 May 2011, 00:57

I have two questions on this death act for Maria Tebano. For the parents I can make out Giuseppe Tebano and Mariangela Campagnano but what is the word in front of Giuseppe? I don't see where the parents are listed as deceased so I assume both are still alive?

Thanks!

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/21 ... bano2.jpg/
Surnames: Aldi, Campagnano, De Carlo, Del Santo, Marcuccio, Tebano
Location: Castel Campagnano and Siracusa

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johnnyonthespot
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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby johnnyonthespot » 13 May 2011, 01:42

Typically you would see the name prefixed by "fu" which I believe literally means "was" but in this usage it implies the person is deceased. So, "figlia di fu Giuseppe" means daughter of the deceased Giuseppe.

On this document, it appears that "furono" is used. I assume the meaning is the same, however this is the first time I have seen the longer term in a document.
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leryan
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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby leryan » 13 May 2011, 03:32

Thank you. I am assuming that both parents are then deceased?
Surnames: Aldi, Campagnano, De Carlo, Del Santo, Marcuccio, Tebano
Location: Castel Campagnano and Siracusa

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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby johnnyonthespot » 13 May 2011, 04:13

I think we should wait for Livio. I would say no, only the father is deceased, but maybe that is the difference between fu and furono...
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Tessa78
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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby Tessa78 » 13 May 2011, 05:06

johnnyonthespot wrote:Typically you would see the name prefixed by "fu" which I believe literally means "was" but in this usage it implies the person is deceased. So, "figlia di fu Giuseppe" means daughter of the deceased Giuseppe.

On this document, it appears that "furono" is used. I assume the meaning is the same, however this is the first time I have seen the longer term in a document.



"Furono" is the plural...
I would say that both parents are deceased...

T.

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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby liviomoreno » 13 May 2011, 09:29

As T. mentioned "Furono" is plural and is referred to both parents

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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby johnnyonthespot » 13 May 2011, 12:49

Thanks, Tess and Livio.

I suspected it was something like that. So, fu/furono are roughly equivalent to was/were. Correct?
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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby leryan » 13 May 2011, 13:59

Thanks for the help everyone!
Surnames: Aldi, Campagnano, De Carlo, Del Santo, Marcuccio, Tebano
Location: Castel Campagnano and Siracusa

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Re: Atti di Morte translation

Postby liviomoreno » 13 May 2011, 14:26

johnnyonthespot wrote:Thanks, Tess and Livio.

I suspected it was something like that. So, fu/furono are roughly equivalent to was/were. Correct?

That's right!


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