1893 Pucciariello Ship Manifest

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1893 Pucciariello Ship Manifest

Postby jllaf » 26 Oct 2012, 16:23

On the Mar. 13, 1893 manifest from the Brittania, my great-grandparents GianBattiste and Filomena Pucciariello came to the US. Search ellisisland.org for "Giobath Puccianelo" - lines 315, 316. On Filomena's line is clearly written the name "Figlia Filom. Branco". I know "figlia" means wife, but her name wasn't Branco, it was Pronio. What can the "branco" mean? Is it possible that she said Pronio and they mis-interpreted it as Branco, or something else?

Thanks,
John LaFianza
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Re: 1893 Pucciariello Ship Manifest

Postby liviomoreno » 26 Oct 2012, 16:28

Figlia means daughter...
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Re: 1893 Pucciariello Ship Manifest

Postby jllaf » 26 Oct 2012, 16:33

Of course. My mistake. The record says "moglie" for wife or spouse. The children are listed below them as "figlia(o)".
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Re: 1893 Pucciariello Ship Manifest

Postby liviomoreno » 26 Oct 2012, 16:36

I saw the manifest, it says "moglie"=wife.
Barnco is Filomena's maiden name. In Italy women keep their maiden name after the marriage
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Re: 1893 Pucciariello Ship Manifest

Postby jllaf » 26 Oct 2012, 16:47

Thanks Livia.

I'll just assume that "Branco" is just a mis-interpreataion of her actual name of Pronio (I have several records that have that name).
There was always the possiblilty it could have meant something else.

Somewhat on the same topic - "Pronio" is the name given to her at birth by the town official because she was "proietta", adopted (we discussed this in other posts a couple of years ago.) I know that the officials gave made-up names to proietti, but there is no literal translation for "Pronio". However, there was a somewhat-famous Italian named Giuseppe Pronio who led the resistance against a Napoleanic French invasion of 1799. Could she have been named for him? Were proietti sometimes named for historic figures?

Thanks again,
John
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