Marriage Record 1847, Domenico DiFelice

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JOHN08
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Marriage Record 1847, Domenico DiFelice

Postby JOHN08 » 21 Feb 2014, 22:10

My translation of this marriage record:

On the 16th of May 1847, appeared Domenico DiFelice, age: 28, born: Sant' Angelo, profession: ?, son of deceased Michele DiFelice, profession: agricoltore [a farmer], and deceased Maria Vincenza Ricci.

Also, appeared Marianna Detti ?, age: 21 ?, born: Sant' Angelo, daughter of deceased Michele Detti ?, profession: calzolaio [a shoemaker], and deceased Maria Guiseppe Colandrea ?,

Appreciate any additions/corrections.

John

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erudita74
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Re: Marriage Record 1847, Domenico DiFelice

Postby erudita74 » 22 Feb 2014, 03:29

JOHN08 wrote:My translation of this marriage record:

On the 16th of May 1847, appeared Domenico DiFelice, age: 28, born: Sant' Angelo, profession: Caffettiere, son of deceased Michele DiFelice, profession: agricoltore [a farmer], and deceased Maria Vincenza Ricci.

Also, appeared Marianna Detti Yes , age: 31 born: Sant' Angelo, daughter of deceased Michele Detti Yes profession: calzolaio [a shoemaker], and deceased Maria Guiseppe Colandrea Yes

Appreciate any additions/corrections.

John

*Caffettiere was a proprietor of a coffee house. He sold coffee within his establishment and might have workers who would deliver coffee to individuals in their apartments, places of businesses, etc. Most of these coffeehouses came into existence by the mid 18th century. Some even had rooms in the back or upstairs where there might be illegal gambling, illicit sex with prostitutes, etc. These establishments might be frequented by members of the various classes, from the lowest workers to the most elite. Even local priests might go there to enjoy the coffee and participate in discussions which took place there. These discussions might involve local neighborhood gossip, as well as politics and other events of the day.

Erudita

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Re: Marriage Record 1847, Domenico DiFelice

Postby JOHN08 » 23 Feb 2014, 02:32

Erudita,

The information about the "Caffettiere" occupation is great; I will include it in the genealogy file for Domenico. How did you find the information ?

Thanks for your help!

John

erudita74
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Re: Marriage Record 1847, Domenico DiFelice

Postby erudita74 » 23 Feb 2014, 13:24

JOHN08 wrote:Erudita,

The information about the "Caffettiere" occupation is great; I will include it in the genealogy file for Domenico. How did you find the information ?

Thanks for your help!

John


You're very welcome, John. I'll get back to you later with sources of info.
Erudita

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Re: Marriage Record 1847, Domenico DiFelice

Postby erudita74 » 23 Feb 2014, 19:40

John
The info I gave you on the occupation came from a book called Paolina's Innocence written by Prof Larry Wolff.

The link below gives a slightly different view of the occupation. It is written in Italian, and my English translation is below that:

http://www.napoligrafia.it/tradizioni/m ... ttiere.htm

A cafettiere was a coffee seller. He walked around the streets of the city at night, when bars and cafés were now closed, but the city was still populated by those working in the theater or in the cinema. He also sold to those who got up too early in the morning before the bars and cafes opened. He had a container in which to hold the coffee, the cups, sugar and, sometimes, even liquor to put in the coffee. He usually attracted his customers by crying out in Italian things like “it’s a long night- warm yourself with a good cup of coffee.”

Erudita


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