Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

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pm16
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Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby pm16 » 10 Feb 2016, 23:19

Can someone tell me because I haven't seen this before...on the death record for Angiola Mastrandrea #103 it lists her husband, but are those other names the names and ages of her children? I don't see her parent's listed on here. Also, I have a hard time deciphering between the numbers 60 & 70..was she 61 or 71? And one more..I've seen the profession listed as Bracciale...what exactly is that? It doesn't come up in google translate.

Thank you! :)
http://antenati.san.beniculturali.it/v/ ... ewsIndex=0

AngelaGrace56
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Re: Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 11 Feb 2016, 00:30

Good questions:

Bracciale is a farmhand or laborer.
She was settantuno which is seventyone. (Sessantuno would be sixtyone, a lot of people get this confused.)
Yes they have listed her children. It says that she has left four male children, Francesco 38, Giuseppe, 35, Cosmo, 30 and Antonio 28; and Anna, female, 37.

Here is a list of Italian Occupations to English which will help you.
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.anc ... ngocc.html

Of course there are still many occupations not included on this list, but this is still a great resource.

Angela :)

erudita74
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Re: Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby erudita74 » 11 Feb 2016, 00:35

Here's some additional info on the occupation bracciale that I have gathered through my research-

The term bracciale or bracciante appears to have been used throughout the southern part of the mainland of Italy, and in Sicily as well. It is derived from the Italian word for arms which meant that he used his hands to work. Translated into English, the word means farmhand or day laborer. Basically a bracciale was an unskilled worker who did not have any specialization out in the field. He also did not have a fixed and permanent position in an agricultural agency. He would receive paid wages for his manual labor. Since a bracciale was not contracted labor, on any given day, he would have to go to the piazza in the center of his village to see if his services were needed for that day. He offered himself for hire at a kind of human labor auction held each day before dawn. There might, however, only be work for one man out of three, so the peasants were encouraged to bid against each other to bring down their terms. Children, as young as eight years of age, were hired as day laborers for as little as 150 lire a day. Their competition in the labor market further undercut prices. In Western Sicily, the day laborers would only work an average of ninety days a year. Their average pay was 600 lire per day. Men who went home without work had to face scolding wives and weeping children. Normally the day laborer lived in a rented home which was usually a large, one room structure. The rental cost about sixty lire annually, so sometimes more than one family would be crowded into the single room to cover the cost. That meant that household members had no privacy.

Because a day laborer’s services were not always needed in his own village, he often had to travel to other towns or provinces in order to find work. This was one of the reasons why he may have been away from his town at the time of some of his children’s births, or at the time of other important events in his family. He might be away for weeks or months at a time, with work for him often being seasonal. This is another reason why he may have been away from his town or village. When there was no work to be had in his native land, migration to the South American countries of Brazil and Argentina, during the 19th century, appeared to be the solution for many who engaged in the occupation of bracciale. Conditions in Italy and in Sicily had gotten so bad, that these day laborers could not earn a living there to support themselves and their families. So they had to migrate to faraway lands in order to do so. The bracciali would help with the harvests in the fields in their own country during certain months of the year, often working in groups to gather grapes in the vineyards and using their bare feet to stomp on them to prepare them for wine production. When it was winter in Italy and Sicily though, they would migrate to various South American countries where the seasons were reversed.

The bracciali or day laborers, like the contadini or peasants, were members of the lowest social class in their society. Normally, their occupation was one that had been passed down from father to son and from generation to generation In some parts of Italy and Sicily, they were also referred to as giornalieri. Basically they were laborers who possessed nothing at all.


Erudita

AngelaGrace56
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Re: Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 11 Feb 2016, 00:55

Erudita

I've just be reading through what you have written here. Thank you. It is so very interesting, and I can see that the topic has been very well researched by you, as always. Thank you again.

Angela :D

erudita74
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Re: Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby erudita74 » 11 Feb 2016, 01:47

AngelaGrace56 wrote:Erudita

I've just be reading through what you have written here. Thank you. It is so very interesting, and I can see that the topic has been very well researched by you, as always. Thank you again.

Angela :D


You're very welcome, Angela. I've tried to research in depth occupations which are in the ancestries of my husband and myself. If you need any others, let me know.
Erudita

pm16
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Re: Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby pm16 » 11 Feb 2016, 01:51

Wow...that is really interesting! Out of all the records I have for my family..they are all peasant farmers and now I see, they are day laborers also. I have also found that some family was born in Brazil so that explains why they were there.
Once again, thank you for the information..you guys are awesome :)

erudita74
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Re: Death record for Angiola Mastrandrea

Postby erudita74 » 11 Feb 2016, 01:55

You're very welcome. Glad I had info on an occupation you needed for your ancestry.
Erudita


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