1832 Birth, Gambatesa

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JOHN08
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1832 Birth, Gambatesa

Postby JOHN08 » 18 Apr 2016, 20:50

On the 5th of April 1832, in Gambatesa, District of Campobasso, Province of Molise, appeared Gennaro Vendetti, 26, farmer, living in Gambatesa, presented a male baby, Giuseppe Antonio, born of Angela Maria Possumato, 28, living in Gambatesa. Giuseppe Antonio was born at 4 a.m. on the 5th of April 1832.

He was baptized on the 5th of April 1832 at the parish church in Gambatesa.

Witnesses: Pasquale D’Alessandro, 62, farmer and Ferdianndo Carano, 28, innkeeper ??

Appreciate corrections/additions.

John
Numero 32
http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.i ... 7.jpg.html

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liviomoreno
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Re: 1832 Birth, Gambatesa

Postby liviomoreno » 19 Apr 2016, 07:11

100% OK

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Re: 1832 Birth, Gambatesa

Postby erudita74 » 20 Apr 2016, 14:28

The birth took place in the house located on Strada Purgatorio.
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Re: 1832 Birth, Gambatesa

Postby erudita74 » 20 Apr 2016, 15:11

About the occupation tavernaio- I know that current lists of Italian occupations translate this word as innkeeper, but I think it's more correct to say that he was a tavern keeper who may or may not have lodged travelers. (see below)
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The tavern keeper bought wine in bulk and sold it to his clients by the liter or half liter. He would use a special measuring bottle to pour out the requested amount, so that his customers did not feel that he had cheated them. He may have also served food, as had been the case in earlier times, but it is also possible that his customers carried in their own food to enjoy with the wine which he served to them. For this reason, his business may have been located nearby to a town bakery or grocery store where food was sold.

Historically, a tavern was more than just a place where a local resident could go to have some wine. In the days of the Romans, for example, it was also a place, which offered a small selection of cooked dishes, and a place where other less legitimate activities often took place. Since a tavern was “the ideal meeting place for those involved in illicit activities, such things as gambling, smuggling, and prostitution may also have taken place there. In earlier times, some taverns even functioned as boarding houses, or lodging quarters, for travelers and, for this reason, were located outside of the urban centers. Before the end of the 13th century, tavern keepers were known to have thrived on the intensification of trade by vending wine, bread, and cheese (and less often), cooked meals.

In the 19th century, the tavern keeper was more than likely a male. Whether or not he had any female help, such as a bar wench to help serve his customers, is not known. His establishment was ultimately dependent upon the work of the braccianti (day laborers) and contadini (peasants) who had worked in the vineyards to gather and press the grapes that would become wine. Some of these same peasants may also been part of his clientele, but it is possible that some of his customers were other businessmen passing through his town.

It is not known whether the tavern owner needed a license to operate his business, or whether or not he needed a certificate of good conduct in order to obtain one, if a license was required. It is also not known whether his town, or the Catholic Church, dictated to him what day and hours he could operate his business. During medieval times, it was the city of Rome that dictated the hours that a tavern owner could operate his business. Specifically, on the day or two before the heathen solstice, which was on June 24th, tavern keepers were required to close their shops at night. This was also the feast day of San Giovanni. During that period of time,witches were said to fly overhead at midnight, causing such an intense revelry, that the city had to issue edicts to tavern keepers to close their shops at night. During those hours, citizens were also not allowed outside the city for scandalous purposes

If your ancestor’s town or village did not dictate what days and hours he could operate his business, and what kinds of foods he could serve, if he did serve any, then perhaps the Catholic Church did. The Church may have required that he close his establishment during the time of Sunday Mass, on religious holidays, or on the feast days of particular saints, as had been done in earlier Roman times. The Church may also have dictated that, on Fridays during the Lenten season, he serve fish, and not meats.

More than likely, as a tavern keeper, he managed a business where his local paesani, or countrymen, could have a drink, rest, play cards, or discuss politics. By the early twentieth century, however, taverns in Italy and Sicily, were even places where arnachists, socialists, and anyone in trouble with the law could gather. In current times, bars there are not so much places where one goes to get an alcoholic drink or glass of wine, or places to discuss politics or play cards, as they are places where one goes for a cup of coffee or espresso, or places to enjoy a croissant or other kind of breakfast pastry.

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Re: 1832 Birth, Gambatesa

Postby JOHN08 » 20 Apr 2016, 23:59

Erudita & Livio,

Thanks for your help.

Erudita, thanks for taking the time and effort for the information about the tavernaio (tavern keeper) occupation; I am sure that it is appreciated by everyone.

John

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Re: 1832 Birth, Gambatesa

Postby erudita74 » 21 Apr 2016, 17:04

You're very welcome, John.
Erudita


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