Something different

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Something different

Postby Nello-LosAngeles » 24 Apr 2007, 15:32

I am working on a VERY tigthly written short story. 101 words or less.
Need help with a translation of a couple sentence.
(Broken English w/ Italian)

She rarely spoke of her Tuscan home and only with anger. “No education women. No work. No food. No tolleranza! Non maritata, mama e' bambina siamo tormentare! Angelina bastarda? No! No!,â€
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Re: Something different

Postby Poipuo4 » 24 Apr 2007, 17:36

Hi, Nello,

I am just taking beginner's Italian, so I hope you don't mind that I try to help. Certainly, the native speakers would know better. I would suggest sposata instead of maritata and sono tormentate instead of siamo tormentare. Sono is both first person singular (I am) and also third person plural (mother and child= third person plural), siamo on the other hand is first person plural (we are). I am taking a guess at tormented. Tormented as an adjective, male singular is tormentato. My guess is that female plural would end in "e." So it would be tormentate. Tormentare is the infinitve= "to torment" as opposed to the adjective.

Again, I only know what I have learned in the past few months...not much! I hope this helps (and that it is correct) and that someone else will answer you too!

Oops, one more thing, no accent over "e" for and. The accent over the "e" makes it mean "it is" as opposed to "and."
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Re: Something different

Postby Nello-LosAngeles » 24 Apr 2007, 18:28

Poipuo4
Thank you for the beautiful grammar instruction. It is very helpful. If you think MARITATA will work I would prefer to use it simple beacause non Italian readers might figure it out more easily.
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Re: Something different

Postby Poipuo4 » 24 Apr 2007, 18:47

My pleasure...for all it is worth!

Hmmm...unfortunately, I do not know the difference in usage between the two words sposato and maritata. (I have only been at this for a few months.) Hopefully sunaj or Ricardo will chime in!
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Re: Something different

Postby The_Shadow » 26 Apr 2007, 19:15

If I could give my 2 cents on the word for married.

Maritata I believe is a derivative of the word marito or husband which is old meaning for a woman who is husband.

Sposata is a truer translation. Though I think the correct conjugation of the verb sposare (to marry) here would be sposa.


You also may find this helpful to a limited degree:

http://ets.freetranslation.com/
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Re: Something different

Postby Nello-LosAngeles » 26 Apr 2007, 21:42

I agree! Useage is a bit confusing. I finally go out Webster's Italian Dictionary. MARITARE is a verb as is SPOSARE a verb.
Maritata is an adj.
I wonder if they are interchangeable?

I would like to hear from one of the native speakers too. Unless I hear other wise I will go with the near cognate maritata.
Thanks again,
Nello
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Re: Something different

Postby elba » 27 Apr 2007, 06:37

Sposare
v.tr.
1 to marry, to get* married to (s.o.): sposò un uomo molto ricco, she married a very rich man
2 (unire in matrimonio) to marry, to join in marriage: li sposò un prete di Roma, a priest from Rome married them
3 (dare in matrimonio) to marry (off), to give* in marriage: sposò sua figlia a un avvocato, he married his daughter to a lawyer
4 (unire) to combine, to wed, to unite: - l'utile al dilettevole, to combine business with pleasures; - il vino con l'acqua, to mix wine and water
5 (abbracciare) to embrace, to espouse: - una causa, un partito, to embrace a cause, a party.


Maritare
1 to marry, to wed*: egli maritò la figlia a un ricco mercante, he married his daughter to a rich merchant
2 (agr.) to train: - la vite all'olmo, to train a vine up an elm.


As you can see the translation of 'maritare' is far more constricted than 'sposare'. Certainly in the context you want to use the word I think that coloquially sposare would be better. The verb maritare is IMHO used more in ceremonies and such.
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