Phrase in a birth record

Having problems with the Italian language? Do you need help to translate or understand an old family document? There is always someone who can help you!
13 posts • Page 1 of 1

Phrase in a birth record

Postby dalbino83 » 05 Jul 2007, 03:09

Forgot to add to my previous post ...

I've been following the children of my great great grandfather in the microfilm birth records for Campodipietra. Most of the children have just their names written in the form, but one child had a phrase after his name that I don't understand. I'm transcribing something written longhand and I may be quite off on the spelling, but I hope someone can recognize it:

Salvatore, e che israinossioses efuera senzoo vita

I know the last word is "life" or "alive" ... are they trying to say he was stillborn? I've found some of his siblings in the US in the next twenty years, but not him, so I'm wondering if he died at birth.

Thanks,
Donna
User avatar
dalbino83
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 47
Joined: 09 Jun 2007, 00:00
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby Incipit » 05 Jul 2007, 08:42

Yes, it probably means he died at birth, cause SENZA VITA means WITHOUT LIFE, but do you have an image of this act?

Tommaso
Incipit
Genealogical researches in Italy
www.incipitprato.com
User avatar
Incipit
Veteran
Veteran
 
Posts: 117
Joined: 09 Feb 2006, 01:00
Location: Prato, Tuscany, Italy

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby dalbino83 » 05 Jul 2007, 13:35

No, but I'll get one the next time I go to the FHC, and post again. Thank you!

Donna
User avatar
dalbino83
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 47
Joined: 09 Jun 2007, 00:00
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby dalbino83 » 25 Jul 2007, 04:57

Finally, I have a picture of the phrase in question. If anyone can translate this, I'd be so grateful!

Image

Donna
User avatar
dalbino83
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 47
Joined: 09 Jun 2007, 00:00
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby pink67 » 25 Jul 2007, 09:45

Sorry for my english but I'll try.....

Is born a baby boy, that she present to me, and she give him the name of Salvatore (maybe Salvatico?) and that I recognize to be without life

It's a literal traduction but the sense is that.... :cry:

Laura
User avatar
pink67
Master
Master
 
Posts: 4451
Joined: 25 Oct 2005, 00:00
Location: italia - liguria

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby dalbino83 » 25 Jul 2007, 12:51

Aw darn, I figured that's what it would be, but still ... it's sad to actually hear that. Salvatore was my great grandfather's baby brother.

How do you spell the phrase after Salvatore's name? I'm just curious as to how close I was with my "translation" above.

Thanks for your help; I appreciate it.

Donna
User avatar
dalbino83
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 47
Joined: 09 Jun 2007, 00:00
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby JohnArmellino » 25 Jul 2007, 19:39

Hi Donna

I believe it says "e che io riconosco essere senza vita" or, as Pink67 said, "and that I recognize to be without life."

I see that you've confirmed that your family is indeed from Campodipietra. Do the records refer to Albino or d'Albino? I suspect the former.

Have you scheduled your trip to Campodipietra yet? Cousin Michele is in Puglia right now - I should have went with him.
John Armellino
JohnArmellino
Master
Master
 
Posts: 659
Joined: 09 Jun 2003, 00:00
Location: West New York (NJ)

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby Poipuo4 » 25 Jul 2007, 20:28

This is so sad. They must have brought the dead baby to town hall as proof. I know that they brought the live babies with them to make the declaration. So heartbreaking....
http://www.celenzaheritage.com

dedicated to the people of Celenza Valfortore, Province of Foggia
User avatar
Poipuo4
Elite
Elite
 
Posts: 387
Joined: 01 Dec 2006, 01:00
Location: Connecticut

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby elba » 26 Jul 2007, 06:29

Poipuo4 wrote:This is so sad. They must have brought the dead baby to town hall as proof. I know that they brought the live babies with them to make the declaration. So heartbreaking....


They would almost certainly have brought a hospital/doctors affermation of the fact to the Registrar as proof of their declaration before him for the Archives and Stato di Famiglia.
If you think education is expensive - try ignorance!
"Gente di Mare Genealogy"
User avatar
elba
V.I.P.
V.I.P.
 
Posts: 739
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 01:00
Location: The Alps - N.Italy

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby Poipuo4 » 26 Jul 2007, 13:10

Ah, I see. Thanks for calriyfing that, Elba.
http://www.celenzaheritage.com

dedicated to the people of Celenza Valfortore, Province of Foggia
User avatar
Poipuo4
Elite
Elite
 
Posts: 387
Joined: 01 Dec 2006, 01:00
Location: Connecticut

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby dalbino83 » 26 Jul 2007, 15:57

Hi John --

The Albino vs D'Albino issue is interesting. In the Campodipietra records, the indexer puts a D' in front of all the last names that begin with A. But the people themselves sign their names without the D' so I'm thinking it must just be a quirk of the indexer. I have only looked at records from 1883 forward so far. I wonder if the older records will show signatures that include the D' in the name, or if they will have an index without the D' preappended on the names.

You've done research on the Albino family in Ferrazzano; did you ever see that quirk of adding the D' before the last name?

Donna
User avatar
dalbino83
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 47
Joined: 09 Jun 2007, 00:00
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby dalbino83 » 26 Jul 2007, 16:06

Ah, John, I just examined your translation. How interesting that they were using the long S in the word "essure" in 1904! I thought that was mostly a mid-19th century phenomenon, and wasn't in use by the 20th century. I'll have to keep that in mind as I puzzle out these records. I've been just printing out the records rather than transcribing them so that I can do more examination of them outside the FHC hours.

No trip to Campodipietra just yet. I did start up an email list with a bunch of my aunts, uncles and cousins to share with them the research I've been doing. Who knows, maybe we can do a family trip out there sometime!

Donna
User avatar
dalbino83
Rookie
Rookie
 
Posts: 47
Joined: 09 Jun 2007, 00:00
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Phrase in a birth record

Postby JohnArmellino » 26 Jul 2007, 18:09

Hi Donna

You've done research on the Albino family in Ferrazzano; did you ever see that quirk of adding the D' before the last name?


In Ferrazzano, I've only seen the spelling Albino, without the "d". I suspect that as you research further back, especially when you get into the processetti and the extracts of the church records, you will see if there has been evolution of the surname from d'Albino to Albino or otherwise.

I've been just printing out the records rather than transcribing them so that I can do more examination of them outside the FHC hours.


I don't know if you're using a software program yet, but if you're not, now is the time to start. There are several good programs out there, including Personal Ancestral File, a free program from the LDS. If you are very good with computers, you might want to look at The Master Genealogist, which is difficult to learn but affords you the best control of your data. Finally, a laptop lets you enter the data at the FHC and avoids duplication of effort.

No trip to Campodipietra just yet. I did start up an email list with a bunch of my aunts, uncles and cousins to share with them the research I've been doing. Who knows, maybe we can do a family trip out there sometime!


Great idea with the family e-mail list. And a campobassani "tour" might be a very good idea - certainly fuel for thought!
John Armellino
JohnArmellino
Master
Master
 
Posts: 659
Joined: 09 Jun 2003, 00:00
Location: West New York (NJ)


13 posts • Page 1 of 1

Return to Italian language, handwriting , script & translations

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 4 guests

Copyright © 2014. www.ItalianGenealogy.com.