Visiting rome

General Non-Genealogy Discussions.
Ask questions, chat and talk about anything.
25 posts • Page 2 of 21, 2

Re: Visiting rome

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 28 Aug 2014, 07:48

Erudita and Peter, thank you both for your replies here. I've enjoyed reading through them.

Thank you for the pointers here Peter. It makes good sense. I am guessing by “pocket book” you are meaning a handbag? I've not familiar with this term.

Erudita, thinking about spoken Italian, I agree, it is so much easier to understand if it spoken slowly but it actually tends to lend itself to being spoken quickly with the way the vowels and consonants mostly alternate. I always love hearing Italian being spoken, more so the dialect I am familiar with though. I had an interesting experience recently, I was sitting in a cafe having lunch and two men and a woman came in and they were obviously speaking Italian. They sat down two tables away from me and I kept glancing over, listening, trying to understand what they were saying. The lady was waving her arms and there was great excitement. I was really loving it. One of the men noticed that I was watching and came over and said to me in his beautiful English “Donta worry, shesa not angry. She justa waves her hands wena she talks.” It was very cute except I felt slightly upset and somewhat displaced that he didn't recognise me as being “full” (as far as I know) Italian. It has somewhat put paid to my idea of going to Italy and just “blending” there.

I don't think I'll be throwing coins in the fountain either. I am not at all superstitious. So when you mention pickpockets Erudita, which seems to happen in big cities everywhere these days, is it just tourists being targeted or anyone?

Angela
AngelaGrace56
Master
Master
 
Posts: 777
Joined: 16 Oct 2012, 10:54

Re: Visiting rome

Postby PippoM » 28 Aug 2014, 11:05

Angela,
there are pickpockets as in all big cities. Of course, they choose crowded places, such as buses, and their favourite target are tourists, as they are new to the place, and don't know how to react, and usually have some money in their wallets.
I'd say, above all, look out at young gipsies. They'll always be asking you money, and while you are listening to one, another will try to steal something from you.
I was never stolen anything on buses, but my wife was stolen her wallet while in the first aid unit of a pediatric hospital; sad to say there are people who go there to take advantage from people who are worried for their children!
I'd also say, one is always worried about thieves and pickpockets, but traffic is more dangerous. Always pay attention when you cross the road, even if you are on zebras!
However, if any of you is coming to Roma in the future, just let me know: I'll be glad to know you and have a walk and a talk.
Giuseppe "Pippo" Moccaldi

Certificate requests and genealogical searches in Italy.
Translation of your old documents and letters.
Legal assistance for your Italian citizenship.
User avatar
PippoM
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1296
Joined: 25 Aug 2004, 00:00
Location: Roma, Italia

Re: Visiting rome

Postby erudita74 » 28 Aug 2014, 11:50

What Pippo says about the young Gypsies is so true.The scenario he describes happened to a cousin of mine at a train station in Naples. I actually was worried about that when we took the train from Naples to Pompeii and then on to Sorrento but we luckily had no problems. In fact, before the train pulled out at the station in Naples, the conductor came through and threw off of the train a group of about 12, whom I gather, he recognized as young individuals who may be a problem for those on the train. Not sure if they were gypsy children though. (By the way, Sorrento is absolutely beautiful and I was happy we got to visit there). In Livorno, I saw a local man fondling women on a crowded bus, and I wanted to scream out, but I just froze and didn't. I guess I was more concerned with protecting my own personal items. I do know of a man though who was pick-pocketed on a bus in Rome. A man traveling should never keep his wallet in his back pocket. My husband owns a safe-pac wallet-worth the investment. He usually keeps an empty wallet in his back pocket, or one with only a dollar or two.

As to crossing streets, in many European cities, you just walk out in the middle of the street and traffic automatically stops for you. I remember it was like that in Switzerland, for example. So you don't have to worry that there are no traffic lights, a concept very strange and uncomfortable to someone like me who's a native NYC girl. Try doing that in Manhattan. (Yeah, right. The cabbies are probably the worst). I remember in Naples that there is one area where about 10 streets converge, if that is the correct way of explaining things. No traffic lights. The cars and buses just keep coming and somehow manage to get around and blend with each other. But try crossing that area-what a nightmare! We were hoping for a native Neopolitan to accompany us across, but it was a Sunday night, and no pedestrians seemed to be around. I closed my eyes and my husband took my arm and dragged me across. No one stopped, and I could feel a bus almost brush across me. It was extremely scary.
Erudita
erudita74
Master
Master
 
Posts: 2923
Joined: 27 Aug 2012, 20:26

Re: Visiting rome

Postby PeterTimber » 28 Aug 2014, 12:19

Is the roof restaurant on top of the Monument to the King of Italy ( The birthday cake is what Romans called it) still in operation ?. My wife and had lunch there on more than one occasion and the views of Rome were magnificent and the dining was superb under those flapping sun screens. Thanks for the memories! Peter
~Peter~
User avatar
PeterTimber
Master
Master
 
Posts: 6739
Joined: 16 Dec 2007, 19:57
Location: Yonkers NY

Re: Visiting rome

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 28 Aug 2014, 12:26

PippoM wrote:Angela,
there are pickpockets as in all big cities. Of course, they choose crowded places, such as buses, and their favourite target are tourists, as they are new to the place, and don't know how to react, and usually have some money in their wallets.
I'd say, above all, look out at young gipsies. They'll always be asking you money, and while you are listening to one, another will try to steal something from you.
I was never stolen anything on buses, but my wife was stolen her wallet while in the first aid unit of a pediatric hospital; sad to say there are people who go there to take advantage from people who are worried for their children!
I'd also say, one is always worried about thieves and pickpockets, but traffic is more dangerous. Always pay attention when you cross the road, even if you are on zebras!
However, if any of you is coming to Roma in the future, just let me know: I'll be glad to know you and have a walk and a talk.


Pippo, thank you for your advice here. There is so much to consider when travelling to big cities. I had heard about the gypsies before from an elderly friend who travelled to Rome a few years ago. I was wondering whether that was still going on. So apparently yes. How horrible for your wife to have something stolen under those circumstances, when as you say, she was already worried about her child. That is very heartless. I've never had anything stolen either but my eldest son has twice now, each time it was his cellphone, once when he was on a bus in Russia, and he was absolutely devasted because he was so far away from home, and the other time it was while we were out shopping together. Well on that note... I'll remember the zebra crossings as well, that they are not so safe. Are the traffic lights any safer?

Angela
AngelaGrace56
Master
Master
 
Posts: 777
Joined: 16 Oct 2012, 10:54

Re: Visiting rome

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 28 Aug 2014, 12:34

erudita74 wrote:What Pippo says about the young Gypsies is so true.The scenario he describes happened to a cousin of mine at a train station in Naples. I actually was worried about that when we took the train from Naples to Pompeii and then on to Sorrento but we luckily had no problems. In fact, before the train pulled out at the station in Naples, the conductor came through and threw off of the train a group of about 12, whom I gather, he recognized as young individuals who may be a problem for those on the train. Not sure if they were gypsy children though. (By the way, Sorrento is absolutely beautiful and I was happy we got to visit there). In Livorno, I saw a local man fondling women on a crowded bus, and I wanted to scream out, but I just froze and didn't. I guess I was more concerned with protecting my own personal items. I do know of a man though who was pick-pocketed on a bus in Rome. A man traveling should never keep his wallet in his back pocket. My husband owns a safe-pac wallet-worth the investment. He usually keeps an empty wallet in his back pocket, or one with only a dollar or two.

As to crossing streets, in many European cities, you just walk out in the middle of the street and traffic automatically stops for you. I remember it was like that in Switzerland, for example. So you don't have to worry that there are no traffic lights, a concept very strange and uncomfortable to someone like me who's a native NYC girl. Try doing that in Manhattan. (Yeah, right. The cabbies are probably the worst). I remember in Naples that there is one area where about 10 streets converge, if that is the correct way of explaining things. No traffic lights. The cars and buses just keep coming and somehow manage to get around and blend with each other. But try crossing that area-what a nightmare! We were hoping for a native Neopolitan to accompany us across, but it was a Sunday night, and no pedestrians seemed to be around. I closed my eyes and my husband took my arm and dragged me across. No one stopped, and I could feel a bus almost brush across me. It was extremely scary.
Erudita


Wow, you've certainly had your horror stories Erudita - and you still love travelling to Europe? When I go to Italy I'm definitely not going to Naples. I've heard so many horror stories about Naples. I like the idea your husband has of a "dummie" wallet. I had thought that I would also do something similar when I've been thinking about this issue. Actually, after reading this I don't think I'm going to move from my 20 km radius ever again :lol: . I am such a whimp. I've got to go now. I will be back with .... you know ... more questions later.

Blessings, Angela
AngelaGrace56
Master
Master
 
Posts: 777
Joined: 16 Oct 2012, 10:54

Re: Visiting rome

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 28 Aug 2014, 12:37

PeterTimber wrote:Is the roof restaurant on top of the Monument to the King of Italy ( The birthday cake is what Romans called it) still in operation ?. My wife and had lunch there on more than one occasion and the views of Rome were magnificent and the dining was superb under those flapping sun screens. Thanks for the memories! Peter


Sorry, I don't know this Peter but someone else will. It sounds magical. I've just moved this down the thread so that we end on a happy wholesome note. Good luck with getting your answer.

Angela :)
AngelaGrace56
Master
Master
 
Posts: 777
Joined: 16 Oct 2012, 10:54

Re: Visiting rome

Postby PeterTimber » 28 Aug 2014, 13:17

Thank you for your kind,gentle and warm thoughts Angela. Peter
~Peter~
User avatar
PeterTimber
Master
Master
 
Posts: 6739
Joined: 16 Dec 2007, 19:57
Location: Yonkers NY

Re: Visiting rome

Postby PippoM » 29 Aug 2014, 10:31

Peter,
I think you're talking about the "Vittoriano" or "Altare della Patria".
Sincerely, I don't know if the cafè is still working...I usually avoid central restaurants, but the view must really be wonderful.

Angela,
we must not be afraid of going out of our courtyard...what is important is taking precautions.
Sometimes we give too much importance to our items, and listen to our ancestral fears.
I also understand it depends on not being able to speak a language, and on being in not familiar places.
For instance, the area I am from, not far from Naples, is known for its criminality. When I came to Roma, someone asked me "Can you go out at night, in your town?", and I answered "Why shouldn't we?". But in Roma, when I am in district with a bad reputation, I must say I feel unconfortable.
One more example. Last week I was in Budapest. We went by bus on the top of a hill with paths in the green. It was about 15/20 km from the city. Quite solitary, but there were children playing, and people with bikes. I was looking for a viewpoint that I knew there had to be, but my wife was very nervous...she didn't want to go round. She was afraid of not being able to go to Budapest again! in the end, we had to get on the bus again, just to keep her calm.
Our mind often drives us away from reality.
Giuseppe "Pippo" Moccaldi

Certificate requests and genealogical searches in Italy.
Translation of your old documents and letters.
Legal assistance for your Italian citizenship.
User avatar
PippoM
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1296
Joined: 25 Aug 2004, 00:00
Location: Roma, Italia

Re: Visiting rome

Postby AngelaGrace56 » 30 Aug 2014, 06:25

Pippo, I agree with what you have said in your previous post and especially about taking precautions, and I would add, especially where personal safety is concerned. I believe that it is really important to first be informed (or to educate oneself) before visiting another country, not just about travel arrangements, sightseeing etc but also about local culture, etiquette and such matters. It is great that posters to this thread have already touched on some of these things and I hope that more people continue to share their knowledge and experiences. Thank you for honestly sharing yours.

Interesting that you mentioned “ancestral fears”. (This could almost be another thread.) A close friend of mine of Italian/Egyptian extraction phoned me during the week and that is exactly what we talked about. I'm starting to wonder whether I am being prompted from above to explore any issues. Your comment certainly “struck a chord when I first read it”.

Angela
AngelaGrace56
Master
Master
 
Posts: 777
Joined: 16 Oct 2012, 10:54

Previous

25 posts • Page 2 of 21, 2

Return to Off Topic - We don't only do Italian Genealogy

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Copyright © 2014. www.ItalianGenealogy.com.