Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
Post Reply
Panciera19
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 3
Joined: 17 Aug 2019, 21:43

Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by Panciera19 » 17 Aug 2019, 22:01

Hello,

I haven't seen this set of circumstances in the threads I've seen, so any insight on whether I have a shot at becoming an Italian citizen would be greatly helpful.

My GGGF was born pre-Italian unification in 1854, married a German woman in the late 1870s, and arrived in Philadelphia in 1881. He had my GGF in 1882 before he suddenly passed away in 1884.

I'm unclear on whether a few things would disqualify me from citizenship:

- Would his marriage to a German woman affect my eligibility?
- Since my GGF became and adult before 1912, would that nullify jure sanguinis?
- I've received documentation that states no US naturalization records of my GGGF are on file, and I don't believe he was able to naturalize in time before his death. So, even though my GGF didn't naturalize with my GGGF, my GGF would've naturalized with my GGGM. Would my GGF naturalizing as a minor with his non-Italian parent also nullify jure sanguinis?

Thank you for any help or insight!

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 2288
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by mler » 21 Aug 2019, 20:28

According to Italy, the German woman became an Italian citizen when she married your gggf.
Your ggf’s birth before 1912 did not affect his Italian citizenship.
Since your ggf was born in the US, his mother’s naturalization had no effect on him. The only thing that would have cost your ggf his Italian citizenship would have been your gggf’s naturalization before 1912.

It seems your path is

Gggf (who never naturalized)
Ggf born in the US and thus couldn’t naturalize
If your gf was next in line, it makes it easier. Remember a woman could not pass citizenship before 1948, so if that applies, you would have a 1948 case

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 2288
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by mler » 21 Aug 2019, 20:28

Sorry, duplicate post.

Panciera19
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 3
Joined: 17 Aug 2019, 21:43

Re: Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by Panciera19 » 22 Aug 2019, 03:40

Thank you so much, mler! This helps me proceed. Yes, the next in line is a woman, so I have a 1948 case.

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 2288
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by mler » 22 Aug 2019, 16:02

You have a 1948 case if your gm had her child (your mom or dad) before 1948. If after that date, it’s a Consulate application.

Panciera19
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 3
Joined: 17 Aug 2019, 21:43

Re: Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by Panciera19 » 11 Nov 2019, 02:17

After a few months of research, I had a few issues pop up - mostly about church records vs. government records. Do you know these issues disqualify me from jure sanguinis?

- My GGGM (German) only has a record in the church she was baptized. She has no German governmental record of her birth.

- I am still looking for my GGGM/GGGF's marriage certificate. I know this certificate will only be from a church, and I still have a few churches to contact in the area they lived for any marriage performed.

- I have not requested my GGGF's birth certificate, but I fear it may be the same (only a church record), as he was born in 1854. Obviously, Italy was not a state then, though he lived in Italy through the Italian unification.

Any insight on whether I should continue with jure sanguinis or not would be most helpful!

I do have a 1948 case, and I have contacted Luigi Paiano. I assumed the above disqualified me, but I thought I should double check. Grazie!

User avatar
mler
Master
Master
Posts: 2288
Joined: 01 Apr 2006, 00:00

Re: Pre-1912 Lack of Naturalization Case

Post by mler » 11 Nov 2019, 14:35

You are qualified, but apparently finding the documentation has been difficult. Since you are applying through an check with him. The documents the courts will accept are sometimes different from those required by the consulate, and he will be able to provide the guidance you

Best of luck.

Post Reply