census v. NO RECORD FOUND

Over 25 million Italians have emigrated between 1861 and 1960 with a migration boom between 1871 and 1915 when over 13,5 million emigrants left the country for European and overseas destinations.
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corrado
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census v. NO RECORD FOUND

Post by corrado » 22 May 2007, 02:48

I have been unable to find a record of my greatgrandfather naturalizing at the record center here in chicago. They have all the court records there from a WPA project so this includes the county coutry, and federal court. They only lived in Chicago, so there are no other jurisdictions involved.

If I get a no record from USCIS will the councilate ask for a search of the census. For some reason the census says they were naturalized, hhhmmm I talked about this before, but it appears they didn't, will I have a problem with this?

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Re: census v. NO RECORD FOUND

Post by wldspirit » 22 May 2007, 06:40

Census information is not 100% guaranteed to be accurate, nor is it proof positive that someone naturalized or did not naturalize.
The document from USCIS will suffice.
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drovedo
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Re: census v. NO RECORD FOUND

Post by drovedo » 22 May 2007, 11:47

Corrado,

Check with the consulate if they require from USCIS a "no record" letter or a "non existence of naturalization" letter.

The consulate I'm going through will only accept a "non existence of Naturalization" letter.


In any case, these docs should be sufficient. Don't bother with the census stuff.

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Re: census v. NO RECORD FOUND

Post by Cathynap » 25 May 2007, 17:50

My grandfather and all 3 of his male cousins received their citizenship by enlisting in the army for 6 months. The army fast tracked them through naturalization. I have my grandfather's naturalization papers (who is also from Chicago) - from Georgia near Camp Gordan where he was stationed. Many of them did this during WWI.

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