Distinguish between gender in 1820s Latin Corleone records

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maria280v2
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Distinguish between gender in 1820s Latin Corleone records

Post by maria280v2 »

Hi,

I would like some translation help on these two italian (latin) baptismal (Corleone/San Martino church) records.

Are either or both of these are for a male infant? They both appear to be named some form of Joseph.
What part of the latin would help me to distinguish between male and female in these records?

https://i.postimg.cc/rsqgnvFc/JBadolato-Baptism1820.png
Source: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1 ... C351544201 : 20 May 2014

https://i.postimg.cc/jqhMwdZj/JBadolato-Baptism1822.png
Source: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1 ... C351544201 : 20 May 2014

Kind regards,
Maria

erudita74
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Re: Distinguish between gender in 1820s Latin Corleone records

Post by erudita74 »

Both female. The letter a at the end of Joseph. The name is Josepha and not Joseph. Also the word for born is nata and not natus.

maria280v2
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Re: Distinguish between gender in 1820s Latin Corleone records

Post by maria280v2 »

Thank you erudita.

I located another record (1813 this time), again same name Josepha Maria to the baby of the same parents.
https://i.postimg.cc/4xLf8YPf/JMBadulat ... sm1813.png
Source: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1 ... C351539001 : 20 May 2014

Is it common for families to keep giving their children the same name?
Might this signify that the child has died and they name the next one the same name?
I plan to check death records to confirm.

bbivona
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Re: Distinguish between gender in 1820s Latin Corleone records

Post by bbivona »

When a child died it was quite common to give a subsequent child that same name, especially if the child was named after a grandparent. I have one family in my ancestry that had four sons named Gioachino, named after the grandfather, and none lived past age 2.
Researching Gibellina, Sicily surnames Bivona, Bonafede, Zummo, Ponzio, Bevinetto, Beninati, Fontana, Cipolla, Bruno, Manfrè, Lanfranca, and Navarra

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